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Full text of "Bulletin of information"

AKUMtS 



NEWTON 

COLLEGE OF 

THE SACRED 

HEART 




NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

1955-1956 



NEWTON COLLEGE 



OF THE 



SACRED HEART 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION 

1955-1956 



NEWTON 59, MASSACHUSETTS 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart 

Library 

885 Centre Street 
Newton, Massachusetts 02159! 



ARCHIVES 



OFFICIAL RECOGNITION 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart was incorporated under 
the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in 1946 and was 
empowered to grant degrees. 

It is a member of 
The American Association of Collegiate Registrars 
The American Council on Education 
The Association of American Colleges 
The College Entrance Examination Board 
The National Catholic Educational Association 
The New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

It is affiliated with the Catholic University of America. 

The curricula for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor 
of Science are registered with the Regents of the State of New 
York. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Post Office Address 5 

Telephone Number 5 

Map (on back cover) 

Access to the College (opposite back cover) 

Correspondence 6 

College Calendar 7 

Advisory Board of the College 11 

Trustees of the College 11 

Officers of the Administration 11 

Wardens 11 

Faculty 12 

In Charge of Health 19 

Business Administration 19 

Placement Office 19 

Officers of the Alumnae Assoc 20 

General Information 21 

History and General Background of the College 21 

Location 22 

Aims 22 

College Life 23 

Physical Education 24 

Placement Office 24 

Requirements for Admission 25 

College Entrance Examination Board Tests 26 

Admission to Advanced Standing 29 

Withdrawal 29 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 30 

Summer Study 31 

Academic Standards 32 

Attendance at Classes 33 

Examinations 33 

Scholarships 40 

The Duchesne Scholarship 40 

The Janet Stuart Scholarship 40 

The Mater Admirabilis Scholarship 41 

The Michael Sweeney Scholarship 41 

The Newton College Alumnae Scholarship 41 

The Gael Coakley Memorial Scholarship Fund 41 

Grant-in-Aid 41 



4 Contents 

Page 

Honors 33 

Bible Lectures 34 

The St. Thomas Lecture 34 

Expenses 38 

Dates of Payment 39 

Reservations 39 

Courses of Instruction 42 

Theology 42 

Art 43 

Classical Language and Literature 43 

Greek 43 

Latin 43 

English 47 

History 50 

Mathematics 53 

Modern Foreign Languages 54 

French 54 

German 56 

Italian 57 

Spanish 58 

Music 60 

Natural Sciences 64 

Pre-medical Course 64 

Biology 65 

Chemistry 67 

Physics 69 

Philosophy 70 

Psychology 73 

Education 73 

Economics 75 

Sociology 75 

Degrees Conferred, 1955 78 

Student Register 79 

Gifts and Bequests 86 

Index 88 



The Post Office address of the college is 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
Newton 59, Massachusetts 



- ft- <* ^ 

Telephone: BIgelow 4-8920 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Communications of special importance should be addressed to 

The President. 

Correspondence regarding studies should be addressed to 

The Dean of Studies. 

Correspondence regarding applications, catalogues, transcripts 
should be addressed to The Registrar. 

Correspondence regarding the health and general welfare of a 
student should be addressed to The Dean of Students. 

Correspondence regarding business and expenses should be ad- 
dressed to The Treasurer. 

Visits to the college should be made by appointment, in order 
that the applicant may be interviewed by the college officials 
and may be shown about the campus. Appointments may 
be made through The Registrar. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 



Thursday, September 15 

Monday, September 19 

Thursday, September 15 

to 
Tuesday, September 20 
Tuesday, September 20 

Thursday, September 29 
Tuesday, October 4 
Wednesday, October 12 
Monday, October 24 
Tuesday, November 1 
Wednesday, November 



ACADEMIC YEAR 1955-1956 
MICHAELMAS TERM 

Registration for Freshmen, 9:00 
A.M.-4:oo P.M. 

Registration for Seniors, Juniors, 
Sophomores, 9:00 A.M.-4:oo P.M. 
Orientation week for Freshmen 
who are required to be present at 
all orientation exercises. 
Mass of the Holy Ghost.* Opening 
of classes. 
Bible lecture.* 

Closing date for change of courses. 
Columbus Day. No classes. 
President's Holiday.* No classes. 
Feast of All Saints. No classes. 
23 First draft of Senior Essay must be 
submitted. 



Wednesday, November 23 

noon to 
Monday, November 28 

9:30 A.M. 
Wednesday, December 7 
Thursday, December 8 

Friday, December 16 ] 

noon to 

Tuesday, January 3 J 

Tuesday, January 3 ] 

to j 

Tuesday, January 10 ) 

Tuesday, January 10 J 

to j 

Thursday, January 19 i 



Thanksgiving Holidays. 

Lily Procession.* 

Feast of the Immaculate Concep- 
tion. No classes. 

Christmas Holidays. 



Reading Period. 



Mid- Year Examinations 



•Attendance is required. 



College Calendar 



CANDLEMAS TERM, 1956 



Monday, January 23 
Sunday, January 29 

8:00 P.M. to 
Thursday, February 2 

8:00 A.M. 
Monday, February 6 
Thursday, February 9 

Tuesday, February 14 

Wednesday, February 22 
Wednesday, March 7 
Thursday, March 15 
Wednesday, March 28 

noon to 

Monday, April 9 

9:30 A.M. 

Monday, April 9 
through 
Wednesday, April 11 

Wednesday, April 18 



Thursday, May 10 

Monday, May 14 

to 
Monday, May 21 

Monday, May 21 

to 
Friday, June 1 



Opening of the Second Semester. 
Annual Retreat.* 



Closing date for change of courses. 
Reverend Mother's Holiday.* No 
classes. 

Completed Senior Essay must be 
submitted to the Dean. 
Washington's Birthday. No classes. 
St. Thomas Aquinas Lecture.* 
Bible Lecture.* 



Easter Holidays. 



Comprehensive Examinations. 



Superior General's Holiday.* No 
classes. 

Ascension Day. No classes. 



Reading Week. 



Final Examinations. 



•Attendance is required. 



College Calendar 



Wednesday, May 30 
Sunday, June 3 
Monday, June 4 



Memorial Day. Holiday. 
Baccalaureate Sunday.* 
Commencement. * 



MICHAELMAS TERM, 1956 - 1957 



Thursday, September 13 

Thursday, September 13 \ 

to 
Tuesday, September 18 J 

Monday, September 17 

Tuesday, September 18 
Thursday, September 27 
Tuesday, October 2 
Friday, October 12 
Tuesday, October 23 
Thursday, November 1 
Wednesday, November 28 

Wednesday, November 28 

noon to 
Monday, December 3 
9:30 A.M. 

Friday, December 7 

Thursday, December 20 \ 

noon to 
Monday, January 7 / 



Registration for Freshmen, 9:00 
A.M.-4:oo P.M. 

Orientation week for Freshmen 
who are required to be present at 
all orientation exercises. 

Registration for Seniors, Juniors, 
Sophomores, 9:00 A.M.-4:oo P.M. 

Mass of the Holy Ghost.* 

Bible Lecture.* 

Closing date for change of courses. 

Columbus Day. No classes. 

President's Holiday.* No classes. 

Feast of All Saints. No classes. 

First draft of Senior Essay must be 
submitted. 



Thanksgiving Holidays. 



Lily Procession. 
Christmas Holidays. 



•Attendance is required. 



io College Calendar 

Monday, January 7 \ 

to Reading Week. 

Monday, January 14 ) 

Monday, January 14 \ 

to [ Mid- Year Examinations. 
Thursday, January 24 / 



THE ADVISORY BOARD 

Most Reverend Richard J. Cushing, D.D., LL.D. 

Mary Donnelly (Mrs. Edward C. Donnelly) 

Thomas Mortimer Gallagher, M.D. 

John BL Gilman, B.A. 

Senator John F. Kennedy, LL.D. 

Daniel Lyne, B.A., LL.D. 

Michael Madden 

Alice Maginnis, M.A. 

Richard H. Nolan, LL.B. 

Right Reverend Msgr. Timothy O'Leary, Ph.D. 

William F. Ray, M.B.A. 

Mary Perkins Ryan, M.A. (Mrs. John Julian Ryan) 

Daniel Sargent, M.A. 

Frank Sawyer 

Reverend Arthur Sheehan, S.J., M.A., S.T.D., Mag. Agg. 

Universitati Gregorianae 
Right Reverend Msgr. Matthew P. Stapleton, S.T.D., S.S.L. 
William K. Wimsatt, Ph.D. 

THE TRUSTEES OF THE COLLEGE 

Agnes Barry, R.S.C.J., M.A., Honorary President 
Eleanor S. Kenny, R.S.C.J., Ph.D., President 
Ursula Benziger, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Alice Egan, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Catherine Maguire, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Margaret McNally, R.S.C.J., B.A. 
Mary H. Quinlan, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Elizabeth Sweeney, R.S.C.J., B.S. 

THE OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

President, Eleanor S. Kenny, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Dean of Studies, Mary H. Quinlan, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Treasurer, Elizabeth Sweeney, R.S.C.J., B.S. 

Registrar, Loretta Santen, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Dean of Students, Margaret G. Smith, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

WARDENS 

Dora Guerrieri, R.S.C.J., M.A Warden of Barat House 

Catherine Maguire, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Warden of Cushing House 

Loretta Santen, R.S.C.J., M.A Warden of Hardey House 

Margaret G. Smith, R.S.C.J., M.A. . . Warden of Stuart House 

Mary E. Walsh, R.S.C.J., M.A Warden of Day Students 

Elizabeth White, R.S.C.J., M.A. . . Warden of Duchesne House 



THE FACULTY 

Erdmute Aradi (Mrs. Z. Aradi) 
Instructor in Art and German 

Graduate studies at the University of Gottingen, the Ac- 
cademia di Belle Arti in Rome and the University of 
Munich. 

Maria L. Balling (Mrs. F. K. Balling) 
Associate Professor of Music 

Graduate of the New Vienna Conservatory of Music. Teach- 
er's Diploma from the Austrian Pruefungskommission fuer 
das Lehramt der Musik an Mittelhochschulen und Lehrer- 
bildungsanstalten. Post-graduate studies at the Universities 
of Vienna, Paris, Milan, and Cambridge. 

Marjorie Bell, B.S. 
Director of Physical Education 

Graduate of the Sargent School of Physical Education. B.S. 
Boston University. 

Muska Brzezinski (Mrs. Z. Brzezinski), B.A. 
Instructor in Art 

B.A. Wellesley College; Graduate study at University of 
California, Boston Museum School, Castle Hill School of 
Art. 

Nicola Carello, M.A. 
Instructor in Italian 

B.A. Morelli College, Vibovalentia; M.A. Boston University. 

Constance Carey, B.A. 
Director of Dramatics 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart. Profes- 
sional Study at American Theatre Wing, New York. 

K. Claude Cirtautas, Ph.D. 
Instructor in Classics 

Ph.D. University of Breslau; post-graduate studies and re- 
search at Harvard University. 

12 



Faculty 13 

Mary Virginia Coleman, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Librarian 

B.A. George Washington University; M.A. Catholic Uni- 
versity of America. 

♦Frances Cunningham, R.S.C.J., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.S. 
Villanova College; candidate for Ph.D. Catholic University 
of America. 

Robert J. Curran, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. Fordham University; M.A. Fordham University; candi- 
date for Ph.D. Fordham University. 

Joanna T. Daly, M.Ed. 
Lecturer in Education 

B.S. in Education, Boston Teachers College; M.Ed. Boston 
Teachers College; graduate study at Harvard University, 
Boston College, Boston University, Salem State Teachers 
College and Boston State Teachers College. 

Louis Garland Davis, M.Music 
Instructor in Voice 

B.Music New England Conservatory; M.Music Boston 
University School of Fine and Applied Arts; study at Ober- 
lin Conservatory and Cherubini Conservatorio, Florence, 
Italy. 

Peggy Davis (Mrs. David Davis) B.Music 
Instructor in Voice 

B.Music George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Joseph Ebacher, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of French 
M.A. Boston College. 

•Absent on leave during the first semester. 



14 Faculty 

John Paul FitzGibbon, M.A. 
Instructor in Philosophy 

B.A. Boston College; M.A. Catholic University of America; 
candidate for Ph.D. Georgetown University. 

Edward J. Fitzpatrick, Jr., M.A. 
Lecturer in Education 

B.M. New England Conservatory of Music; M.A. Columbia 
University; graduate study at Alabama Polytechnic Institute 
and Harvard University. 

Helen M. Frawley (Mrs. W. Joseph Frawley), B.A. 
Instructor in Biology 

B.A. Emmanuel College; Graduate studies at the Marine 
Biological Laboratory and Harvard University. 

Reverend George Q. Friel, O.P., ST.Lr., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Theology 

B.A. St. Thomas College, River Forest; M.A. Catholic Uni- 
versity of America; ST.Lr. Pontifical Institute of the Im- 
maculate Conception, Washington; Ph.D. Catholic Univer- 
sity of America. 

Dora Guerrieri, R.S.C.J., M.A., Ch.M. 

Director of Newton School of Liturgical Music 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; B. Mus. 
Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Catho- 
lic University of America; Ch.M. American Guild of 
Organists. 

Maria Teresa Guevara, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of French and Spanish 

M.A. Fordham University; Ph.D. Fordham University. 

Marchand Marie Hall, M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A. Trinity College, Washington, D. C; M.A. Catholic 
University of America. 



« 



Faculty 15 

Florence M. Hawkins, M.Ed. 
Lecturer in Education 

B.S. in Education, Boston Teachers College; M.Ed. Boston 
Teachers College; graduate study at Boston College, Boston 
University, Harvard University. 

Margaret Hurley, B. Music 
Instructor in Voice 

B.Music, New England Conservatory of Music; Associate in 
Music Diploma, McGill University. 

Mary Lou Julian, B.A. 

Instructor in Biology and Chemistry 

B.A. Newton College of the Sacred Heart. 

Margaret T. Kane, M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. Emmanuel College; M.S. Boston College. 

Mary Kenney (Mrs. Richard Kenney) B.Music 
Instructor in Piano 

B.Music, Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; candi- 
date for M.A. New York University; Diploma, Pius XII In- 
stitute of Fine Arts, Florence, Italy; Choir Master American 
Guild of Organists. 

Eleanor B. Linehan, M.Ed. 
Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Boston University; M.S., Boston University; candidate 
for D.Ed., Boston University. 

James J. Lynch, M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S. New York University; M.S. City College of New York; 
candidate for Ed.D. Center for Human Relations, New York 
University; graduate study at Columbia University and at 
the Universities of Paris, Copenhagen and Innsbruck. 



16 Faculty 

Catherine E. Maguire, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.A. Columbia Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. Fordham University. 

J. Patricia Marsh, M.Ed. 
Instructor in Education 
B.A. Emmanuel College; M.Ed. Harvard University; 
Graduate studies at the University of Nottingham, Boston 
College, Boston University; candidate for Ed.D. Harvard 
University. 

Faine McMullen, R.S.C.J., LL.B. 
Instructor in History 

B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; LL.B. Fordham Uni- 
versity. 

Marie Mullin, M.A. 
Instructor in History 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. 
Radcliffe College. 

Anthony Nemethy, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Sociology and Economics 

B.A. Academy of Law, Kecskemet; M.S. College of Agricul- 
ture, Vienna; Ph.D. Royal Hungarian Palatin, Joseph Uni- 
versity of Technical and Economic Sciences, Budapest. 

Ruth T. Pyne, B.Art Education 
Lecturer in Education 

B.Art Education Rhode Island School of Design; candidate 
for M.A. Boston College; graduate study at Rhode Island 
College of Education and Nottingham University, England. 

Mary Quinlan, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 
B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. 
Catholic University of America; Ph.D. Catholic University 
of America. 



Faculty 17 

Antonio Regalado, Ph.L. 
Instructor in Spanish 

B.A. National Institute of Salamanca; Licenciado en 
Filosofia y Letras University of Salamanca. 

Jesus Maria Sanroma 

Visiting Professor of Music 

Loretta Santen, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Theology 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; B.S. 
Library Science, Columbia University; M.A. Catholic Uni- 
versity of America; M.A.R.Ed. Providence College. 

Margaret G. Smith, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; B.Music 
Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Fordham 
University; candidate for Ph.D. Fordham University. 

Thomas A. Sokol, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A. Emory and Henry College, Emory, Va.; M.A. George 
Peabody College, Nashville, Tenn.; Cand. Ph.D. George 
Peabody College; graduate study Harvard University. 

Very Reverend Msgr. Matthew P. Stapleton, S.S.L., S.T.D. 
Lecturer in Sacred Scripture 

B.A. Boston College; S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome; S.T.D. Pontifical Athenaeum of the Urban College 
De Propaganda Fide, Rome. 

Olga Stone, M. Music 
Instructor in Piano 

B.Music Boston University College of Music; M.Music Bos- 
ton University College of Music; study at New England 
Conservatory of Music; private study with Madame Helen 
Hopekirk, Lukas Foss, Alfredo Fondacaro. 



18 Faculty 

Marjorie Underwood (Mrs. Aidan Underwood), B.A. 
Assistant Librarian 
B.A. Regis College 

Mary E. Walsh, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.Ed. Teachers College of Boston; M.Ed. Boston College; 
M.A. Boston College. 

Rudolf W. Waniek, Ph.D. 
Lecturer in Mathematics and Physics 

Ph.D. University of Vienna, Post-graduate studies and re- 
search at the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Stock- 
holm, Uppsala, Rome, Milan, Paris, Zurich and Goteborg. 

Mary C. Wheeler, R.S.C.J., Ph.L.* 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Uni- 
versity of Detroit; M.A.R.Ed. Providence College; Ph.L. 
Catholic University of America; candidate for Ph.D. Catho- 
lic University of America. 

Elizabeth White, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. 
Radcliffe College. 



*Absent on leave. 



IN CHARGE OF HEALTH 

George Quigley, M.D. Attendant Physician 

Thomas Gallagher, M.D. Attendant Physician 

Margaret Doyle, R.N. Resident Nurse 

Helen Bartko, R.N. Resident Nurse 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Joseph Daniel Murphy, M.A. Director of Dining Services 

Frederick S. Ormond Superintendent of Grounds 



PLACEMENT OFFICE 

James J. Lynch, M.S. Placement Director 



19 



OFFICERS OF NEWTON COLLEGE ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION 

President - pro tem 
Jane Gallagher '50 1955-1956 

67 Beaumont Avenue, Newtonville, Mass. 

Vice-President - New York Area 
Alice A. O'Brien Clifton '53 (Mrs. Peter F.) 1955-1 957 

365 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 

Vice-President - Washington, D. C. Area 
Anne Rogers Devereux '50 1955-1957 

i West Bradley Lane, Chevy Chase, Maryland 

Corresponding Secretary 
Justine Kenney '52 1954-1956 

159 Lowder Street, Dedham, Mass. 

Recording Secretary 

Mary Heanue '52 1955-1957 

11 Kenwood Avenue, Newton Centre, Mass. 

Treasurer 
Anne Fulton '53 1 955-1957 

275 Marsh Street, Belmont, Mass. 

M ember s-at-Large 
Gertrude Walsh Crowley '50 (Mrs. J. Richard) 1 955- 1 957 

16 Hancock Avenue, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Mary Lou Julian '50 1954-1956 

31 Marcia Road, Watertown, Mass. 
Mary Nolan '55 1955-1957 

25 Vermont Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 
Alice Higgins Slattery '53 (Mrs. William M.) 1954-1956 

20 Greendale Avenue, Needham Heights, Mass. 
Sarah Lee Whelan '53 1954-1956 

33 Fletcher Road, Belmont, Mass. 

20 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORY AND BACKGROUND 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart is a four-year college 
established in 1946 by the Religious of the Sacred Heart with 
the approbation and encouragement of His Excellency Arch- 
bishop Richard J. Cushing of Boston. 

The Religious of the Sacred Heart founded the Boston Acad- 
emy of the Sacred Heart in 1880, and in 1926 transferred this 
school to Newton as the Newton Country Day School of the 
Sacred Heart. On September 8, 1945 the Schrafft estate adjoining 
the Country Day School was purchased for the purposes of the 
proposed college. On February 2, 1946 the home of Mr. Henry 
Harriman was acquired, and to it in 1949 the Rutherford estate 
was added. A corporation was formed on March 19, 1946, to 
which was granted by the General Court of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts, on recommendation of the Board of Collegiate 
Authority, a charter giving "authority to grant and confer all 
degrees such as are usually conferred by colleges in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, except degrees in Medicine and degrees 
(other than honorary doctorates) in Law." 

The affiliation with the Catholic University of America ob- 
tained in 1946 was, in 1951, renewed and extended. 

The first Freshman Class was received in September 1946, 
with the plan of admitting one additional class each succeeding 
year until a regular four-year college should be in operation. 
Thirty-four Seniors received their B.A.'s at the first Commence- 
ment Exercises of the College in June 1950. 

The Society of the Sacred Heart was founded in Paris in the 
year 1800 by Saint Madeleine Sophie Barat for the education of 
girls. The first foundation in America was made in 1818 by 
Blessed Philippine Duchesne, one of Saint Madeleine Sophie's 
first companions. 

At present on all the continents, the Society has schools 
and colleges which share the advantages of an international 
educational organization. The Mother House is in Rome, where 

21 



22 General Information 

it is customary for the members of the Society to spend a 
period of time as a normal part of their training. The young 
religious are also sent to houses of study in various American 
and foreign University centers. 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart takes its place among the 
institutions of the Society as a liberal arts college deriving its 
principles from the great tradition of Catholic culture and 
striving to apply them to conditions of the world today. 

LOCATION 

The college is located in greater Boston on Centre Street in 
Newton. A campus of approximately forty acres affords ample 
space for future development and the natural beauty of its 
location has already been enhanced by careful planning and 
cultivation. The advantages of life in the country are combined 
with easy access to the rich cultural resources of the city of 
Boston. There are good recreational facilities on the campus. 

AIMS 
Those responsible for this college share the position of all 
Catholic educators who believe that man has a supernatural 
destiny. To fulfill her duties, a woman who has capacity to profit 
by the necessary training should have knowledge and an interest 
in acquiring further knowledge; the power of independent 
thought, with freedom from prejudices and from subservience to 
commonly accepted standards, if such standards do not bear the 
test of truth and justice; a firm grasp of moral principles and 
a character sufficiently strong to support and defend these prin- 
ciples; powers of judgment and reasoning which have been 
developed by practice in the application of principles to matters 
of importance; and, because the education of a woman would 
otherwise be incomplete, a training in the appreciation of the 
beautiful and a development of those finer qualities of mind and 
heart which strengthen the dignity and the power of women. 
The aim of developing the natural powers and gifts of a woman 
in such a way as to fit her for her duties in life with reference 
to her supernatural destiny determines the character of the 
curriculum. 



General Information 23 

COLLEGE LIFE 

The authorities of the college leave much freedom to the stu- 
dents and entrust them with responsibility in the belief that 
education is a progressive development, and that young women 
of college age have reached a stage of mental and moral growth 
at which it is advantageous for them to bear such responsibility. 
The officers of Student Government, elected by the Student Body, 
enforce regulations in cooperation with a Faculty Adviser. 

The spirit of the college is essentially based upon Catholic 
ideals and practices. The students follow courses in Sacred 
Scripture, Theology and Liturgical Music; and daily Mass and 
attention to the changes in the liturgical cycle are looked upon 
as normal factors in their training. Besides an organization for 
stimulating works of charity and zeal among the students, there 
is a Sodality of the Children of Mary, the purpose of which is 
the spiritual advancement of its members. 

The college administration lays much stress on the programme 
of academic and personal guidance in which the officers of 
administration and the members of the faculty cooperate with a 
view to the best development of the individual student in 
accordance with her gifts and interests. The resident students 
live in the five Houses: Barat, Cushing, Duchesne, Hardey, and 
Stuart, each of which has its own Warden and its group of stu- 
dents representing a cross-section of the college. In this way, all 
classes mingle freely, and the upperclassmen pass on college tra- 
ditions to their younger sisters. 

There are a number of student organizations some of which 
are rather closely related to academic courses, while others are 
purely social and non-academic in character. The varied inter- 
ests of the students find opportunities for expression in such 
groups as the Glee Club, the Dramatic Association, the Inter- 
national Relations Club, etc. There is also intercourse with the 
students of other colleges in the New England area, not only in 
intercollegiate athletic contests but also in meetings of an aca- 
demic character and in purely social events. A blanket tax is 
paid by each student to cover the expenses of the various or- 



24 General Information 

ganizations operating in the college. The officers of Student 
Government, of Social Committee, and of all major clubs acting 
as a financial Committee allocate the proceeds of this tax ac- 
cording to the needs of the organizations. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Freshmen and Sophomores are required to participate in two 
hours of physical education a week. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of good body mechanics to improve physical ap- 
pearance and efficiency and to gain recreational skills which may 
be used during and after college. The activities included are 
archery, badminton, basketball, conditioning exercises, field 
hockey, golf, softball, tennis, and volleyball. Besides the regular 
athletic program in which all the students participate, those 
who wish to do so may engage in other forms of activity, such as 
skiing, skating, riding, etc. 

PLACEMENT OFFICE 

The Placement Office offers vocational guidance to students 
and to alumnae of the College. This service includes occupa- 
tional information, talks by authorities in vocational and occu- 
pational fields, interviews with experts, visits to organizations, 
and placement services for undergraduates and alumnae in full 
or part time, paid or volunteer positions. 



ADMISSION 

ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

The requirements for admission to the Freshman Class are: 

1. English 4 units 
Foreign Languages 4 units 

No less than 2 units in any one language. 
Mathematics 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit; Plane Geometry 1 unit. 
History 1 unit 

Social Sciences 1 unit 

Or a second unit of History 
Natural Science 1 unit 

Electives in academic fields 3 units 

2. A satisfactory school record and the recommendation of 
the head of the school as to health, character, and fitness 
for college work. 

3. Acceptable scores in the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the 
College Entrance Examination Board and in three CEEB 
Achievement Tests, one of which must be English. For 
information on the tests see pp. 24^27. In certain cases 
other examinations may be substituted for those of the 
CEEB. 

4. A personal interview if possible. 

5. If an applicant cannot fulfill in detail all the require- 
ments listed above, she is encouraged to present her rec- 
ords to the Committee on Admissions. If the Committee 
finds that the applicant shows promise of succeeding in 
college work, a special arrangement for admission may be 
made. 



25 



GENERAL INFORMATION CONCERNING COLLEGE 
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION BOARD TESTS 

During the academic year 1955-1956, the College Entrance 
Examination Board will hold a complete series of examinations 
on each of the following dates: 

Saturday, December 3, 1955 Saturday, March 17, 1956 
Saturday, January 14, 1956 Saturday, May 19, 1956 
Wednesday, August 8, 1956 

On each of the dates listed above, the schedule of tests will 
be as follows: 

8:45 A.M.— Scholastic Aptitude Test 

(Verbal and Mathematical Sections) 
1:45 P.M.— Afternoon Tests— Candidates may take not more 
than three of the following: 

Achievement Tests: Latin 

English Composition Spanish 

Social Studies Biology 

French Chemistry 

German Physics 

Greek (March only) Advanced Mathematics 

Italian (March only) Intermediate Mathematics 

Aptitude Test: 
Spatial Relations 

The Greek and Italian tests will be given only to candi- 
dates who register in advance specifically for them. 

The schedule permits a candidate to take the morning Scholas- 
tic Aptitude Test and a maximum of three of the afternoon tests. 

The publication, College Board Tests (Bulletin of Informa- 
tion), obtainable without charge from the College Entrance 
Examination Board, contains rules regarding applications, fees, 
and reports; rules for the conduct of the tests; advice to candi- 
dates; descriptions of the tests; sample questions and answers; 
and lists of examination centers. 

26 



Admission 



27 



Candidates should make application by mail to the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Students who wish to take the 
examinations in any of the following states, territories, or for- 
eign areas should address their inquiries and send their applica- 
tions to College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. Box 27896, 
Los Angeles 27, California: 



Arizona 

California 

Colorado 

Idaho 

Montana 

Nevada 

New Mexico 



Oregon 

Utah 

Washington 

Wyoming 

Territory of Alaska 

Territory of Hawaii 

Province of Alberta 



Province of British Co- 
lumbia 

Republic of Mexico 

Australia 

Pacific Islands, includ- 
ing Japan and For- 
mosa 



Candidates applying for examination in any state or foreign 
area not given above should write to College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board, P. O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey. 

Application forms will be sent to any teacher or candidate 
upon request. When ordering the forms, candidates must state 
whether they wish applications for the December, January, 
March, May, or August tests. Application forms for the Decem- 
ber tests will be available early in the fall; those for the January 
tests will be ready for distribution about November 1; those 
for the March series, about January 9; forms for the other two 
series will be available immediately after the preceding series 
has been held. A copy of the Bulletin of information is routinely 
sent to every candidate requesting an application blank. 

Each application submitted for registration must be accom- 
panied by the examination fee. A detailed schedule of fees 
follows: 

Scholastic Aptitude Test and one, two, or three 

hours of afternoon tests $12.00 

Scholastic Aptitude Test only 6.00 

One, two, or three hours of afternoon tests only .... 8.00 



28 Admission 

All applications and fees should reach the appropriate office 
of the Board not later than the dates specified below: 

For examination centers located 

in the United States, in Europe, Asia, 

Canada, Alaska, Hawaii, Africa, Central and 

the Canal Zone, Mexico, South America, and 
Date of Tests or the West Indies Australia 

December 3, 1955 November 12 No Administration 

January 14, 1956 December 17 November 26 

March 17, 1956 February 25 January 28 

May 19, 1956 April 28 March 31 

August 8, 1956 July 18 June 20 

Applications received after these closing dates will be subject 
to a penalty fee of three dollars in addition to the regular fee. 

Candidates are urged to send in their applications and fees as 
early as possible, preferably at least several weeks before the 
closing date, since early registration allows time to clear up 
possible irregularities which might otherwise delay the issuing 
of reports. Applications received at a Board office later than 
one week prior to the date of the examination cannot be ac- 
cepted. No candidate will be permitted to register with the 
supervisor of an examination center at any time. Only properly 
registered candidates holding tickets of admission to the centers 
at which they present themselves will be admitted to the tests. 
Requests for transfer of examination centers cannot be con- 
sidered unless these reach the appropriate Board office at least 
one week prior to the date of the examination. 

Colleges advising candidates abroad to offer the College Board 
tests should notify them that requests for the establishment of 
overseas centers should reach the appropriate Board office not 
later than two months prior to a scheduled examination date. 
The application and fee of a candidate requesting an overseas 
center must be received in the appropriate Board office before 
arrangements can be made to establish the center. In December, 
no administrations are held outside the United States, Alaska, 
Canada, the Canal Zone, Hawaii, Mexico, and the West Indies. 



Admission 29 

Candidates abroad who would normally apply for this series 
should register instead for the January tests. 

The Board will report the results of the tests to the institu- 
tions indicated on the candidates' applications. The colleges 
will in turn notify the candidates of the action taken upon their 
applications for admission. Candidates will not receive reports 
upon their tests from the Board. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

An applicant for advanced standing must present: 

1. An official transcript of all work done at each secondary 
school and college attended. 

2. Evidence of ability to meet the regular requirements for 
admission to the college as well as the requirements for 
admission to advanced standing. 

A student may be tentatively admitted to advanced standing 
at the beginning of either semester but not after the first semes- 
ter of Junior Year. 

Terms of admission are conditioned by the following stipula- 
tions: 

(a) No credit will be given for a course with a grade of less 
than C. 

(b) All credit accepted must represent work which is ap- 
plicable to the current curriculum of the college. 

(c) The work for which credit is accepted must be substan- 
tially equivalent in quality and quantity to that for which 
it is offered as a substitute. 

WITHDRAWAL 

The College reserves the right of asking the withdrawal of any 
student whose scholarship is not satisfactory or who is not in 
accord with the standards required by the College. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

i. Theology: Theology 105-106; 205-206; 307-308; 

409-410. Bible 107-108; 207-208. 

2. Philosophy: Philosophy 105-106; 201-202; 301-302; 

401-402. 

3. English: English 101-102; 201-202. 

4. History: History 101-102; 471-472. 

5. Natural Science: Science 101-102 or Science 121-122. 

6. Major Field: In addition to the courses required of all 
candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts, each student 
will be required to take at least eight upper division courses* 
in a field of concentration which must be selected before the 
end of her Freshman year from among the following fields: 
Art, Biology, Chemistry, Classics, English, History, Mathe- 
matics, Modern Foreign Languages, Music, Philosophy, 
Psychology and Education, Sociology and Economics. 

7. Senior Essay: An essay of approximately 6,000 words on 
some aspect of a subject chosen from the field of concentra- 
tion, showing ability to consult sources and organize the 
matter so obtained. A publication in a reputable off-campus 
magazine may, with the Dean's approval, be substituted for 
the Senior Essay. For those who elect Music as a major 
subject a public concert or a musical composition of con- 
siderable length may take the place of the Senior Essay. 

8. Comprehensive Examination at the end of the senior year. 
This examination is given in order to evaluate the student's 
knowledge in her field of concentration, not by considering 
specific course content, but by testing her grasp of the field 
as a whole. The student is expected to widen and deepen 
her knowledge by independent reading in preparation for 
this examination. 



•An upper division course is one on Junior or Senior level and is num- 
bered in the 300's or 400*8. 

30 



Requirements for Degree 31 

9. A grade of C is required in any course that is to fulfill the 
requirements in the major field. 

10. Physical Education: Freshmen and Sophomores are ex- 
pected to participate in the program of physical education, 
and those who fail to do so are penalized by the loss of 
academic standing. 

11. The required minimum scholastic average must be main- 
tained.* 

12. Freshman Option: In addition to the required courses each 
Freshman must make a choice of one of the following: 

two semesters of Latin, or Greek I, or Math 101-102, or 
Music 119-120 or two semesters of the language studied in 
High School, or the first year of a language not studied be- 
fore. If the last option is taken, the student must continue 
the study of the language for two more semesters before 
credit will be given. Those who expect to major in science 
must take Math 101-102, and those who expect to major in 
music must take Music 119-120.** 

SUMMER STUDY 
Credit is given for work of at least C grade done at summer 
sessions of approved institutions. Students must have the per- 
mission of the Dean before registering for summer courses. Six 
points of credit, equivalent to six semester hours, is the maxi- 
mum granted in a summer session of six weeks. 



•See p. 32. 
•♦Students majoring in one of the sciences will find their requirements 
listed under their respective science: Biology, p. 65, Chemistry, p. 67. 



ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

The standing of a student is determined by her class work 
and by her achievement in the mid-year and final examinations. 
The marking system is as follows: 

A+ = 99> 98, 97 % \ 



A = 96, 95> 94 
A ~ = 93> 9 2 » 9 1 * 9° 



Excellent, outstandingly 
fine work 



B+ = 89, 88, 87 \ 

B = 86, 85, 84 Very good work 

B- = 83, 82, 81, 80 ) 

C+ = 79> 78, 77 ) 

C = 76, 75, 74 Good adequate work 

C- = 73* 72, 71, 7° ) 

D+ = 69, 68, 67 \ 

D =z 66, 65, 64 . Passing work 

D— = 63, 62, 61, 60 ) 

E = 59 to 5° 

(A mark of E indicates that the student has failed to pass the 
subject for which the mark is given, but in certain cases one 
re-examination may be allowed. If the re-examination is passed, 
the mark becomes D on the record. Failure in the second ex- 
amination automatically gives F for the course, which may not 
be made up by re-examination.) 

F = Below 50 Failure 

Students are required to maintain a minimum scholastic 
average of C— . A student who fails to do this is automatically 
in poor scholastic standing and may be dropped from the col- 
lege. In such a case, the college will do everything possible to 
obtain her admission to another school. 

Students on the Dean's List are those who during the previous 
semester have maintained a scholastic average of B-f-. Honor 
students are those who during the previous semester have main- 
tained a scholastic average of A— or more. 

32 



Academic Standards 33 

ATTENDANCE AT CLASS 

Students are expected to attend all their scheduled college 
classes and not to absent themselves without sufficient reason. 
However, as emergencies inevitably arise during the course of 
a college semester, and to allow a certain freedom where these 
are concerned, Freshmen are allowed six self-excused absences 
a semester; Sophomores are allowed eight self-excused absences 
a semester; Juniors, ten; Seniors, twelve. Students on the Dean's 
List are entitled to as many self-excused absences as they carry 
hours of class a week, but during a term they may not excuse 
themselves from the same class more times than that class meets 
in a week. Honor students are entitled to an unlimited number 
of self-excused absences from class. Students in poor scholastic 
standing are entitled to no self-excused absences. 

Self-excused absences do not relieve the student from responsi- 
bility for work required while she was absent, nor do they give 
her credit for a quiz that she may have missed. 

EXAMINATIONS 

An examination period occurs at the end of each semester. 
Unexcused absence from an examination is counted as a failure 
in the course. Absence from an examination is excused only for 
illness or a serious emergency. 

There are two periods a year set aside for re-take examinations 
when students who have permission may present themselves: 

(1) Immediately before college opens in September. 

(2) Within the first month of the Candlemas term. 

HONORS 

The college confers honors at graduation upon students who 
have maintained a high average of scholastic excellence during 
their entire course. The senior essay and the comprehensive 
examinations taken together count as a term's work whose result 
added to that of the eight terms is divided by nine. The scholas- 
tic average required for a degree cum laude is 87-91%; for 
magna cum laude, 92-95%; for summa cum laude, 96% and over. 



36 



Requirements for Degree 



Juniors 




Seniors 




History of Music II 




Orchestration 


2,2 


(required) 


3>3 


Composition II 


3>3 


Two of the following: 




Conducting 


2,2 


Composition I 


3*3 


Musical Literature 




Counterpoint II 


3*2 


(piano) 


2,2 


Form and Analysis 


3>3 






ajor in Organ 


Hrs. 




Hrj 


Freshmen 




Sophomores 




Harmony I 


3*3 


History of Music I 


3>3 


Advanced 




Counterpoint I 


3>3 


Sight Reading 


2,2 


Chant I and II 


3>3 


Juniors 




Seniors 




History of Music II 


3>3 


Organ Class (Gregorian 


Composition I 


3>3 


Accompaniment, Im 


- 


Counterpoint II 


3>2 


provisation, musica 


1 


Style 


1 


literature) 


5.5 






Choral Technique 


2,2 






Orchestration 


2,2 


ajor in Church Music 


Hrs. 




Hrs 


Freshmen 




Sophomores 




Harmony I 


3>3 


History of 




Advanced 




Music I 


3>3 


Sight Reading 


2,2 


Harmony II 
Advanced 


3>3 






Sight Reading 


1,1 






Modern Foreign Lan 








guage 


3*3 






Counterpoint I 


3>3 


Juniors 




Seniors 




History of Music II 


3>3 


Chant chironomy 


2,2 


Choral Conducting 




Study of Sacred Music 


2,2 


(measured music) 


3>3 


Chant III 


3>3 


Chant I and II 


3>3 







Requirements for Degree 



37 



Major in Voice 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Freshmen 




Sophomores 


Harmony I 


3>3 


Harmony II 3,3 


Advanced 




Advanced 


Sight Reading 


2,2 


Sight Reading 1,1 
History of Music I 3,3 
Counterpoint I 3,3 


Juniors 




Seniors 


History of Music II 


3>3 


Musical Literature 


Vocal Repertoire (Sole 


► 


(alternate voice and 


and Group) 


2,2 


piano) 2,2 


Choral Conducting 


2,2 


Opera Workshop 5,5 


Form and Analysis 


3*3 


Piano Accompaniment 
Class (Prerequisite: 
ability to read on 
third year level) 2,2 


Major in Music Education Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Freshmen 




Sophomores 


Harmony I 


3>3 


History of Music I 3,3 


Advanced 




Ensemble (Musical Lit- 


Sight Reading 


2,2 


erature, keyboard 
work, accompaniment) 2,2 
Counterpoint I 3,3 


Juniors 




Seniors 


History of Music II 


3>3 


Orchestration 2,2 


Music Methods I 


3»3 


Music Curriculum De- 


History and Philosophy 


r 


velopment 2,2 


of Education 


2,2 


Music Methods II 3,3 


Educational Psychology 


2,2 


(Practice Teaching) 



EXPENSES 

Tuition, room, board for the year $1700.00 

Tuition, luncheon for Day Students 750.00 

Tuition for part-time students per semester hour 15.00 

Application Fee 10.00 

This fee is payable when application is made for 
admission, and is not refunded. It must be paid 
by all, including those who receive financial aid. 

Reservation Deposit: 

Day Students 50.00 

Resident Students 100.00 

This deposit is required of all students, both new 
and old. It is made by resident students to secure 
a room, by day students to reserve a place. The 
deposit must be paid by May 1st and is not refund- 
able after June 1st. If a resident student changes 
to a day student after June 1st the deposit is auto- 
matically forfeited. 

Special Fees: 

Late registration 5.00 

Late reservation 5.00 

Aptitude Testing for Freshmen 5.00 

Re-examination and special examinations 5.00 

Transcript 1.00 

Laboratory fees for Biology, Chemistry and Physics 

for the year, each 30.00 

If more than one course is taken per year, the 
charge for each additional course will be $10. 

Use of piano and practice room for the year 30.00 

Laboratory fee for Education majors 10.00 

Art for the year 25.00 

38 



Expenses 



39 



Graduation fee 25.00 

Board during vacation periods, per week 3500 

Fee for linen supply service per year 23.00 

(This fee is to be paid directly to the company 

which supplies the service.) 
Insurance for accident and illness is available for 

those who wish such coverage. 
Special Fees must be paid by all, including those who 

receive financial aid. 
A student requiring a special diet will take her meals 

in the Infirmary. For this there will be a special 

charge. 

DATES OF PAYMENT-REFUNDS 

Bills are rendered on an annual basis and are payable on or 
before the opening day of each semester. Payments must be 
made before a student may take her place in the classroom in 
any semester. No deduction or refund is made for delay in re- 
turning at the beginning of the term, or for absence after enter- 
ing, or for withdrawal. 





Reservation 

Deposit 
payable be- 
fore May 1st 


On or 
before 
Registra- 
tion Day 


On or before 
First Day 
of Second 
Semester 


Day Students 
Resident Students 


$ 50. 
IOO. 


$375- 
850. 


$325- 
750- 



Special fees will be charged on the bill for the Second Semester. 
Deposits will be credited on the bill for the Second Semester. 

Since some parents prefer to pay tuition and board in monthly 
installments during the academic year, Newton College is glad 
to offer this convenience under the Newton-Waltham Bank and 
Trust Company. The cost is 4% greater than when payment is 
made in cash at the beginning of each term. Upon request, the 
Treasurer will send the necessary information and forms. 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

A scholarship is above all a scholastic honor. All who receive 
scholarships are maintaining a scholastic average of at least B— . 
A limited amount of aid is available. This will be given on a 
competitive basis and candidates interested in competing should 
apply not later than the early part of the scholastic year preced- 
ing their entrance into college. Students who receive financial 
aid are not expected to do any special compensatory work. All 
students at Newton contribute to the public service. 

The Scholarship examination will take place on the last Satur- 
day of January from 12:30 to 3:30 P.M. 

Registration for the scholarship examination is not considered 
as an application for college. No fee is charged. 

Those who obtain scholarship aid are required to pay the 
usual application fee of $10, and any special fees. 

The Duchesne Scholarship 

In 1948, the members of the Duchesne Teachers' Guild ex- 
pressed their loyalty to the Society of the Sacred Heart and their 
support of Newton College by the establishment of a four-year 
partial scholarship for day students. In 1953 it was renewed and 
was won by Nancy Harvey, Rosary Academy, Watertown, 
Massachusetts. 

In 1955, the Duchesne Teachers' Guild has donated another 
scholarship, a full one for a day student for four years. This 
has been awarded to Kathleen Kingston, St. Gregory's High 
School, Dorchester, Massachusetts. 



The Janet Stuart Scholarship 

The Janet Stuart Guild has offered scholars' aid of I750, which 
has been won by Mary Ford Whalen of the Girls' Latin School. 

40 



Scholarships 41 

The Mater Admirabilis Scholarship 

The gift of $500 of an Alumna of Eden Hall goes under the 
name of the Mater Admirabilis Scholarship towards the scholars' 
aid won by Sheila Quinlan of the Academy of the Sacred Heart, 
Greenwich, Connecticut. 

The Michael Sweeney Scholarship 

The scholars' aid of $450 offered by Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Sweeney has been won by Catherine Joyce of Rosary Academy, 
Watertown, Massachusetts. 

The Newton College Alumnae Scholarship 

The Alumnae Association of Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart has offered partial scholars' aid of $700, which has been 
awarded to M. Patricia Peck of the Convent of the Sacred Heart, 
Torresdale, Pennsylvania. 

The Gael Coakley Memorial Scholarship Fund 

In memory of her husband, Gael Coakley, Dorothy McLough- 
lin Coakley, an Alumna of the Convents of the Sacred Heart, 
Rochester and Manhattanville, has inaugurated an endowment 
fund known as The Gael Coakley Memorial Scholarship Fund. 
The first donations have been given in the names of Gael 
Coakley Jr., Barbara Coakley Lennon, and Mary Hayes Coakley. 

Grant-in-Aid 

Newton College offers a grant-in-aid program by which a 
student who needs financial aid a.nd does not hold a scholarship 
can receive a reduction in tuition and pay the equivalent of 
this reduction by working for the College at the rate of seventy- 
five cents an hour. No student is allowed to work more than 
ten hours a week while College is in session. Clerical work, 
switchboard service and library service, and other occupations of 
this type are assigned by the Administration. A contract between 
the College and the student specifies the number of hours of 
work to be done per year. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses with a double number, such as Art 203-204, extend 
throughout the year. 

Courses with an odd number are given in the first semester; 
those with an even number in the second semester. Courses for 
under-classmen are numbered 100 and 200; those for upper- 
classmen are numbered 300 and 400. 

Courses marked with an asterisk will be offered in 1955-1956. 
The number in parentheses after the title of the course indicates 
the number of semester hours of credit. 

The College reserves the right to withdraw the offer of any 
course not elected by at least five students. 

THEOLOGY 

♦Theology 105-106. THEOLOGY I. (2) (2) 

Introduction to Theology. Summa Theologica. Part I. 
God, His Existence, and His Essence. Required for Fresh- 
men. MOTHER SANTEN 

♦Bible 107-108. (1) (1) 

Old Testament. Required for Freshmen. 

mother Mcmullen 

♦Theology 205-206. SUMMA THEOLOGICA PART I. 

(3) (3) 

The distinction of the Divine Persons. The procession of 
creatures from God. The production of creatures; their 
distinction; their conservation and government. Required 
for Sophomores. FATHER FRIEL 

♦Bible 207-208. (1) (1) 

New Testament. Required for Sophomores. 

MOTHER McMULLEN 
♦Theology 307-308. SUMMA THEOLOGICA PART II. 
(2) (2) 
The rational creature's advance towards God. The last end 
of man. The means to attain that end. The theological and 
the cardinal virtues. Required for Juniors. 

MOTHER SANTEN 
♦Theology 409-410. SUMMA THEOLOGICA PART III. 

(4) (4) 

42 



Courses of Instruction 43 

Christ, who as man is our way to God. The Incarnation 
and the Life of Christ. The Sacraments. The Four Last 
Things. Required for Seniors. FATHER FRIEL 

ART 

•Art 201-202. DRAWING AND PAINTING. (5) (5) 

Required for Sophomores majoring in Art. MRS. ARADI 
♦Art 301-302. HISTORY OF ART I. (3) (3) 

Western Art. Survey up to and including the Renaissance. 
Art 303-304. HISTORY OF ART II. (3) (3) 

Western Art. Survey from the Renaissance to the present 
time. 
•Art 305-306. HISTORY OF EASTERN ART. (3) (3) 

MRS. BRZEZINSKI 
Art 307-308. PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN. (3) (3) 

A course in the fundamental principles of color and of two- 
dimension and three-dimension design with training in tech- 
niques of drawing, painting and metal work. 
•Art 309-310. LETTERING AND LAYOUT. (2) (2) 

MRS. BRZEZINSKI 
•Art 311-312. FIGURE DRAWING. (2) (2) 

MRS. BRZEZINSKI 
•Art 401-402. SCULPTURE. (3) (3) 

MRS. ARADI 
•Art 403-404. INTERIOR DECORATION. (2) (2) 

MRS. ARADI 
Art 407. HISTORY OF COSTUME. (2) 

A study of the styles of dress from classical times to the 

present day, with suggestions for theatrical costuming and 

period illustration. 

•Art 303. TEACHING OF ART IN THE ELEMENTARY 

SCHOOL. (2) MISS PYNE 

CLASSICAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE 

*C1. Lang. 101. GREEK AND LATIN FOR USE. (3) 

This course is offered to enable students to acquire a sound, 



44 Courses of Instruction 

functional vocabulary of Latin and Greek and Greek bases 
and affixes, deduce meanings of unfamiliar Latin and 
Greek words, understand English Classics, without constant 
reference to glossaries, read with greater facility and write 
with greater vocabulary power. No knowledge of either 
language is required. Open to students of all fields. 

DR. CIRTAUTAS 
CI. Lang. 103-104. CLASSICAL CIVILIZATION. (2) (2) 
This two-semester sequence introduces the student to the 
cultures of Ancient Greece and Ancient Rome. The work 
includes lectures, readings in translation from Greek and 
Roman literature, both reports, and the study of slides il- 
lustrating classical art and architecture. No knowledge of 
the Greek or the Latin language is required. Open to 
Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors not concentrating in Clas- 
sics. 

GREEK 

•CI. Lang. 131-132. GREEK I. (4) (4) DR. CIRTAUTAS 

CI. Lang. 201-202. GREEK PROSE. (3) (3) 

Xenophon: Anabasis, Book IV. Plato: Apology. Thucy- 
dides: History of the Peloponnesian War, Book II. Herod- 
otus: Histories, selected parts. Collateral readings in Greek 
history. 

CI. Lang. 437-438. GREEK DRAMA. (3) (3) 

Aeschylus: Prometheus Bound. Sophocles: Antigone. 
Euripides: Medea. One comedy of Aristophanes. Survey of 
the development of Greek drama. 

CI. Lang. 321-322. HOMER, HESIOD AND LYRIC POETS. 

(3) (3) 
Selections from the first six books of the Iliad, Hesiod's 
Works and Days and selections from the Lyric Poets. 
CI. Lang. 336. GREEK ORATORY. (2) 

Demosthenes' On the Crown and selections from other 
orators. 



Courses of Instruction 45 

*C1. Lang. 335. MYTHOLOGY. (2) 

Greek and Roman myths with special reference to their use 

in literature and art. DR. CIRTAUTAS 

CI. Lang. 439-440. CLASSICAL AESTHETIC AND POETIC. 

<*) (2) 
Study of relevant selections from the writings of Plato, 
Aristotle, Horace, Plotinus and Longinus. 

LATIN 

*C1. Lang. 201-202. BEGINNING LATIN. (4) (4) 

A study of Latin fundamentals. The aural-oral approach 
in the reading of continuous Latin prose. Careful attention 
to the mastery of forms, syntax and vocabulary. Frequent 
practice in Latin composition. DR. CIRTAUTAS 

CI. Lang. 203-204. CICERO AND VIRGIL. (3) (3) 

Selections from the orations and letters of Cicero in the first 
semester. The equivalent of six books of the Aeneid in the 
second semester. 

CI. Lang. 308. OVID. (3) 

Selections from the Metamorphoses. A study of the Augus- 
tan age. 

CI. Lang. 307. VIRGIL. (3) 

Eclogues. The Bucolics and Georgics. A study of Tibulus 
and Propertius. 

CI. Lang. 310. ROMAN COMEDY. (3) 

Survey of the Greek origins of comedy at Rome. Plautus 
and Terence; a representative play by each. The technique, 
characteristics and style of Roman comedy. 

CI. Lang. 317. HORACE AND CATULLUS. (3) 

Selections from Horace's Odes and Epodes and from the 
Lyrics of Catullus. 

CI. Lang. 318. ROMAN SATIRE. (3) 

Study of the satire as developed by the Romans with special 
emphasis on the satires of Horace, Juvenal, Martial. 



46 Courses of Instruction 

CI. Lang. 409-410. ROMAN PHILOSOPHY. (2) (2) 

Lucretius De Rerum Natura, Cicero, De Officiis, De Senec- 
tute; Selections from Seneca and Marcus Aurelius. 

CI. Lang. 411-412. MEDIAEVAL LATIN. (2) (2) 

Lectures and reading of works written in Latin from the 
fourth to the fourteenth century, including ecclesiastical 
Latin. 

•CI. Lang. 415-416. LATIN PROSE COMPOSITION. 

(2) (2) 
A review and advanced study of the grammar and syntax. 
Readings from the classical and ecclesiastical authors. Exer- 
cises in composition are based on Bradley-Arnold, Latin 
Prose Composition. DR. CIRTAUTAS 

CI. Lang. 417. ROMAN HISTORIANS. (3) 

Readings in Livy's account of the Second Punic War; 
Tacitus' Agricola or Germania. 

CI. Lang. 418. LETTERS OF CICERO AND PLINY. (3) 
The letters will be studied as reflecting the political and 
social life contemporary with the two authors. 

CI. Lang. 319-320. CLASSICAL LITERATURE. (3) (3) 
A study in translation of the authors not read by students 
in the original language and a review of Greek and Roman 
history. Open to Juniors and Seniors concentrating in 
Classics. 
•a. Lang. 205-206. LATIN SIGHT READING. (2) (2) 
Reading of Latin at sight. DR. CIRTAUTAS 

CI. Lang. 413-414. SAINT AUGUSTINE. (2) (2) 

A study of the text of Confessions of St. Augustine with 
philosophical, historical and political references. 

CI. Lang. 415. ADVANCED LATIN COMPOSITION. (2) 
The students who wish to take this course are urged to 
make a careful study of the text of Cicero's De Senectute 
and Somnium Scipionis, with concentration on development 
of a Latin style. 



Courses of Instruction 



47 



CI. Lang. 416. METHODS OF TEACHING LATIN. 

(1) (1) 
Visiting of classes, examination of current textbooks, prac- 
tice in teaching, and written reports required. 
CI. Lang. 417-418. THESIS SEMINAR. (3) (3) 

Required of all Classical Language majors in their senior 
year. 

ENGLISH 

Students majoring in English are required to take the follow- 
ing courses: 

Eng. 203-204 



Sophomore Year: 
Junior Year: 



Senior Year: 



Junior or 
Senior Year: 
English 103-104. 
♦English 101-102. 



Shaping Forces behind Eng- 
lish Literature 

Eng. 209-210 History of English Lan- 
guage 

Eng. 301-302 Fourteenth Century Eng- 
lish Literature 
English Seminar 
Shakespeare 



Eng. 401-402 
Eng. 319-320 
SPEECH. (1) (1) MISS CAREY 

WORLD LITERATURE I. (3) (3) 
Reading in translation of great works of various literature 
of ancient and medieval times; writing of themes, and class 
discussions of both. Required for Freshmen. 

MOTHER WHITE 
♦English 201-202. WORLD LITERATURE II. (3) (3) 

Reading of representative works from the Renaissance 
through the nineteenth century; writing of themes. Re- 
quired for Sophomores. MISS HALL 
♦English 203-204. SHAPING FORCES BEHIND ENGLISH 
LITERATURE. (4) (4) 
An analysis through lectures, reading and discussion, of 
the temper and controlling ideas of English Literature from 
the Anglo-Saxon period through the nineteenth century. 
Readings will be chosen to illustrate each period and to 
suggest transitions between periods. 

MOTHER MAGUIRE 



48 Courses of Instruction 

♦English 209. HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE. (2) 
An introductory course in the development of the language 
from the earliest period to the present day. First semester: 
From Old English through Middle English. Second Semes- 
ter: Elizabethan English, Modern English, American Eng- 
lish. MISS HALL 

♦English 301-302. FOURTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH 

LITERATURE. (3) (3) 

First semester: Readings in Chaucer with background study 

of the fourteenth century. Second semester: Langland, the 

Pearl Poet, the English mystical writers, the cyclical plays. 

MOTHER WHITE 
♦English 309-310. SHORT STORY. (3) (3) 

Critical theory and group discussion of stories written by 
members of the class. MOTHER MAGUIRE 

English 313. JOURNALISM. (2) 

First semester: Brief survey of the techniques of newswrit- 
ing. Second semester: The writing of feature articles and 
editorials. 

English 314. INTRODUCTION TO TELEVISION PRO- 
DUCTION. (2) 

English 315-316. THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. (3) (3) 
Humanism in English literature; St. Thomas More, Spenser, 
Marlowe, other Elizabethan writers, and Bacon studied 
against the background of the Renaissance and Reforma- 
tion. The metaphysical poets and representative prose 
writers 1600-1660; brief consideration of Milton as an em- 
bodiment of Renaissance attitudes. Emphasis on changing 
ideas in religion, philosophy, "Science", and political theory, 
and the significance of these changes for the modern world. 

English 319-320. SHAKESPEARE. (3) (3) 

Shakespeare as dramatist and poet. A study of the tech- 
niques and construction of the plays, the theatre of Shake- 
speare's day, Shakespearean criticism, theories of tragedy. 



Courses of Instruction 49 

English 325. SCIENCE AND IMAGINATION IN THE 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. (3) 
The impact of modern scientific discoveries on the heritage 
of medieval thought. Selected readings from Francis Bacon 
and other seventeenth century prose writers; the metaphysi- 
cal poets. Consideration of the revolt against Aristotle, the 
growth of modern scepticism, the effects of conflicting ideas 
on creative imagination. 

English 326. MILTON. (3) 

A detailed study of the life and principal writings of Milton 
in the light of the political, religious and cultural tendencies 
of his day. 
♦English 331-332. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ENGLISH 
LITERATURE. (3) (3) 
Readings in prose and poetry from Dryden through Words- 
worth. Emphasis on changing concepts of nature, standards 
of taste, theories of beauty, and the reaction against deism 
and neoclassicism. Emergence of the romantic spirit. 

MISS HALL 

English 335-336. NINETEENTH CENTURY LITERA- 
TURE. (3) (3) 
The Romantic poets, prose of Lamb, Hazlitt and De Quin- 
cey. Consideration of minor writers in relation to the social 
and intellectual problems of the period. Prose of Newman, 
Ruskin, Arnold, and Carlyle. Poetry of Tennyson, Brown- 
ing and others. Social, intellectual, and religious problems 
of the Victorian age as reflected in literature; the develop- 
ment of Catholic thought and expression. 

♦English 351-352. MODERN POETRY. (3) (3) 

Reading and discussion of twentieth century poets, English 
and American. MOTHER MAGUIRE 

English 355-356. MODERN DRAMA. (3) (3) 

The theory of modern drama with emphasis on the intel- 
lectual and social forces shaping it. Reading and criticism 
of plays. 



5° Courses of Instruction 

English 357-358. THE MODERN NOVEL. (3) (3) 

Readings in the American, English and Continental novels 
of the twentieth century. 
♦English 359-360. CURRENT LITERATURE. (1) (1) 

Reading of fiction, poetry, biography and essays published 
during the current year, with class discussion. Fifteen books 
will be read each semester. One hour a week. 

MOTHER MAGUIRE 
English 363-364. AMERICAN LITERATURE. (2) (2) 
Study and evaluation of major writers from Irving to the 
present day. Consideration of colonial backgrounds and of 
the attitudes of American writers toward the heritage and 
tradition of European literature. 
♦English 401-402. ENGLISH SEMINAR. (2) (2) 

This course of intensive reading with class reports and dis- 
cussion is required of Senior English majors in preparation 
for the comprehensive examination. Two hours a week. 

MOTHER MAGUIRE 

HISTORY 

The following courses are required for students majoring in 
History: 
Sophomore Year: Hist. 201-202 Historical Bibliography and 

Methods 
Junior Year: Hist. 301-302 History Reading List 

Senior Year: Hist. 401-402 History Seminar 

Other courses may be chosen as electives under the guidance 
of the Dean and the Major Professor. 
*Hist. 101-102. WESTERN CIVILIZATION. (3) (3) 

A study of selected problems to be seen against the general 
background of European history. Required for Freshmen. 

MISS MULLIN 

♦Hist. 201-202. HISTORICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY AND 

METHODS. (3) (3) 

An introduction to historical method and a preliminary 

survey of historiography. MOTHER SMITH 



Courses of Instruction 51 

♦Hist. 301-302. HISTORY READING LIST. (2) (2) 

Selected readings designed to deepen the student's knowl- 
edge of the field. Required for Juniors majoring in history. 

MOTHER SMITH 

Hist. 307-308. ANCIENT HISTORY. (3) (3) 

The great cultures of the ancient world, with special em- 
phasis on Greece and Rome. 

Hist. 313-314. MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION. (3) (3) 

A study of the disintegration of the Roman Empire; the 
barbarian invasions; the rise of monasticism; the origin and 
development of feudalism; the relations between the Papacy 
and the Empire; the achievements of medieval culture; its 
decline. 

Hist. 331. NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE. (3) (3) 
A study of the development of modern Europe from the 
French Revolution to the First World War. Particular 
attention will be given to the social, economic and intel- 
lectual movements which have contributed to the shaping 
of the ideas and institutions of the contemporary world. 

Hist. 332. TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPE. (3) 

Attention will be focused on the reasons for the failure of 
collective security in the inter-war period, and on the con- 
temporary quest for a new principle of authority. 

Hist. 333-334. LATIN-AMERICAN HISTORY. (3) (3) 
Iberian backgrounds. Explorers, conquerors and settlers. 
Missionary and other cultural endeavors. Society and edu- 
cation in the colonial period. Establishment of independent 
republics. Political developments of the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. 
*Hist. 343-344. ENGLISH HISTORY. (3) (3) 

Survey of the history of England with special emphasis on 
the social and economic aspects. MOTHER SMITH 

Hist. 351. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION. (3) 
A study of the forces which caused the intellectual, religious 
and commercial revolutions affecting the break-up of medi- 
eval civilization. Special emphasis given to the Protestant 
Revolt and the Catholic Reform. 



52 Courses of Instruction 

Hist. 352. EMERGENCE OF THE NATION STATES. (3) 
A study of the origins and development of the modern 
European state-system, covering the period from 1648 to 
1789. 
Hist. 367-368. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. (2) (2) 
A comparative study of the governmental institutions of 
Great Britain, France, the U.S.S.R. and China. 
♦Hist. 375-376. AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL 
HISTORY. (3) (3) 
A study of the origins and development of the Constitution 
of the United States. MOTHER McMULLEN 

Hi st. 377-378. POST-WAR INTERNATIONAL 
RELATIONS. (3) (3) 
An analysis of principal trends since World War II with 
emphasis on the policies of major powers, the role and func- 
tioning of the United Nations, and current events. 
*Hist. 401-402. HISTORY CO-ORDINATING SEMINAR. 

(2) (2) 
Discussion of problems designed to show the mutual inter- 
action of history and other disciplines such as Philosophy, 
Literature, Geography, Economics. MOTHER SMITH 

*Hist. 403-404. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN 
CIVILIZATION. (3) (3) 
Introduction to political, social, economic, cultural aspects 
of American life since 1920. Required of upperclassmen. 

MOTHER QUINLAN 
DR. NEMETHY 
*Hist. 409. AMERICAN FRONTIER. (2) 

Political, social, economic implications of the frontier. 

MOTHER McMULLEN 
*Hist. 410. AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY. (2) 

Foreign policy of the United States with special emphasis 
on twentieth-century diplomacy. MOTHER McMULLEN 
*Hist. 411. REVOLUTIONARY FRANCE. (3) 
Political and social history of France, 1763-1815. 

MISS MULLIN 
*Hist. 412. MODERN FRANCE. (3) 

History of France, 1815 to the present. MISS MULLIN 



Courses of Instruction 53 

MATHEMATICS 

♦Math. 101-102. FRESHMAN MATHEMATICS. (4) (4) 
Elements of college algebra and plane trigonometry; Co- 
ordinates, equations, straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse 
and hyperbola, rotations of axes, elements of solid analytic 
geometry. MOTHER WALSH 

♦Math. 203-204. DIFFERENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALr 
CULUS. (3) (3) 
Definition of derivative. Derivation of formulas of differen- 
tiation of the elementary functions. Application to Geom- 
etry, Mechanics, Physics and Chemistry. Integration as the 
inverse of differentiation. Derivation of formulas of inte- 
gration. The definite integral as a sum. Application to 
problems in Physics and Chemistry. Brief study of differ- 
ential equations. Prerequisite for mathematics majors. 

MOTHER WALSH 

♦Math. 205-206. MATHEMATICS FOR SCIENCE. (2) (2) 
Differential and Integral Calculus (particular stress upon 
series expansion, maxima and minima, numerical and 
analytical methods of integration), Basic Differential Equa- 
tions (formulation of various problems in terms of differ- 
ential equations, methods of treatment), Mathematical Sta- 
tistics (evaluation of experimental data and their statistical 
significance, various distributions met in practice, curve 
fitting and applications out of the theory of equations). 

DR. WANIEK 

Math. 301. INTERMEDIATE CALCULUS. 

Partial derivatives, multiple integrals, with application to 
physical problems, infinite series. Three hours a week. 

MOTHER WALSH 

Math. 302. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS. 

An introductory course in the solution and application of 
ordinary differential equations. Three hours a week. 

MOTHER WALSH 



54 Courses of Instruction 

Math. 309. ADVANCED ALGEBRA. (3) (3) 

Real Numbers and their Properties. Complex Variable. 
Polynomial and their Fundamental Properties. Elementary 
Methods of Solution of Equations. Cubic and Quartic 
Equations. The Theorems of Sturm and Budan. Horner's 
and Newton's Methods of Approximating Roots, Some 
Principles of Determinants. Theory of Linear Dependence. 
Linear Equations. Theorems on the Rank of a Matrix. 
Linear Transformations and Matrices. Permutations. 
Combinations. Probability. 

Math. 310. THEORY OF NUMBERS. (3) (3) 
*Math. 407-408. ADVANCED CALCULUS. (3) (3) 

A. Elementary Functions for Complex Values and Taylor's 
Series; Partial Differentiation and Implicit Functions; Vec- 
tors, Curves and Surfaces in Space; The Definite Integral; 
Multiple Integrals. 

B. The Gamma Function and Related Definite Integrals; 
Elliptic Integrals; Legendre Polynomials and Bessel Func- 
tions. MOTHER WALSH 

*Math. 409. VECTOR AND TENSOR ANALYSIS. (3) 

Elements of vector algebra, products of vectors, differentia- 
tion, operator nabla, theory of vector fields, elementary 
properties of the linear vector function. 
Math. 410. THEORY OF MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS. 

(3) 
Discussion of curves in various co-ordinates, algebraic and 
transcendent curves, continuity, singular points, curve of 
Gauss, interpolation (Newton, Lagrange). 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

FRENCH 

Students majoring in French must take the following courses: 
Sophomore Year: Mod. Lang. 209-210 
Mod. Lang. 211-212 
Mod. Lang. 225-226 



Courses of Instruction 55 

Junior Year: 4 upper-division courses 

Senior Year: Mod. Lang. 469-470 

2 other upper-division courses 

*Mod. Lang. 103-104. FRENCH I. (3) (3) 

MR. CARELLO 

*Mod. Lang. 107-108. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH. (3) (3) 
Continuation of Mod. Lang. 103-104. MR. EBACHER 

♦Mod. Lang. 209-210. SURVEY OF FRENCH 
LITERATURE. (3) (3) 

MR. EBACHER 

*Mod. Lang. 211-212. FRENCH COMPOSITION I. (3) (3) 
Introductory sight translation and composition. 

*Mod. Lang. 225-226. FRENCH CONVERSATION. (2) (2) 
This course is designed to give practice in the spoken lan- 
guage by means of class discussion. MR. EBACHER 

Mod. Lang. 301-302. MEDIEVAL AND SIXTEENTH CEN- 
TURY FRENCH LITERATURE. 
(3) (3) MR. EBACHER 

Mod. Lang. 317-318. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY. 

(3) (3) 
A study of French Classical Literature in the seventeenth 
century. The authors studied are: Corneille, Boileau, 
Bossuet, La Fontaine, Moliere, Racine, La Bruyere, Fenelon. 
Three hours a week. Required of majors in French. 

*Mod. Lang. 319-320. 18TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERA- 
TURE. (3) (3) 

MOTHER GUEVARA 

Mod. Lang. 321-322. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 
NINETEENTH CENTURY. (3) (3) 
The first semester will be devoted to the Romantic move- 
ment, with special emphasis on poetry. The second semes- 
ter will cover realism, naturalism, and symbolism. 



56 Courses of Instruction 

♦Mod. Lang. 421-422. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 

TWENTIETH CENTURY. (3) (3) 
A study of the main trends in twentieth century French 
literature. MOTHER GUEVARA 

Mod. Lang. 450. METHODS OF TEACHING MODERN 
LANGUAGES. 
This course will consist of both the theoretical methods of 
teaching French in primary and secondary schools and the 
practical application of both these methods under super- 
vision. 
♦Mod. Lang. 469-470. FRENCH SEMINAR. (2) (2) 

MR. EBACHER 
GERMAN 
♦Mod. Lang. 141-142. GERMAN I. (3) (3) 

DR. CIRTAUTAS 
♦Mod. Lang. 241-242. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN. (3) (3) 

MRS. ARADI 
Mod. Lang. 243-244. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERA- 
TURE. 
A survey of German literature from the early beginnings 
to modern times. The German contribution to the develop- 
ment of European culture illustrated by selected readings 
from mediaeval and classical German literature. Three hours 
a week. 
Mod. Lang. 247-248. CLASSICAL GERMAN LITERATURE. 
Readings: Lessing, Herder, Goethe, Schiller. Three hours 
a week- 
Mod. Lang. 337-338. ADVANCED GERMAN. 

Reading of prose literature of the XIX and XX century. 
Sight translations and prepared translations. Reports and 
assigned research. Three hours a week. 
Mod. Lang. 349-350. GERMAN ROMANTICISM. 

Early Romanticists; High Romanticists; Patriotic lyrics; 
The Heidelberg School; the North German Group; The 
Young German Movement; The Swabian poets; The 
Austrian writers; Political Poets of the 1840's. Three hours 
a week. 



Courses of Instruction 57 

Mod. Lang. 351-352. REALISM AND NATURALISM IN 
GERMAN LITERATURE. 
The literary Circles of Munich; Wagner; Nietzche; the 
Period of Historicism and Germany's Unification; realism; 
naturalism and expressionism. Three hours a week- 
Mod. Lang. 353-354. CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LIT- 
ERATURE. 
Modern trends in literature in twentieth century Germany. 
Three hours a week. 

ITALIAN 

•Mod. Lang. 161-162. ITALIAN I. (3) (3) 

Elements of Italian grammar. MR. CARELLO 

♦Mod. Lang. 165-166. ITALIAN CONVERSATION. (2) (2) 

Class discussions on the following topics: Italian art, Italian 

life, towns and regional characteristics, economic problems, 

and important Italians of our century. MR. CARELLO 

♦Mod. Lang. 267-268. ITALIAN COMPOSITION. (3) (3) 

Exercise in Italian composition. MR. CARELLO 

♦Mod. Lang. 271-272. SURVEY OF ITALIAN 

LITERATURE. (3) (3) 
Outline of literature, characteristics of each region. Bio- 
graphical sketches of the major writers. Intensive reading 
of the most representative selections of these authors. 

MR. CARELLO 
Mod. Lang. 361-362. ADVANCED ITALIAN COMPOSI- 
TION. (2) (2) MR. CARELLO 

Mod. Lang. 373-374. IL TRECENTO. 

Readings in 14th century literature. Emphasis on life, works 
and influence of Dante, Petrarca and Boccaccio. 

Mod. Lang. 375-376. DANTE. 

Reading of Divina Commedia. Analysis in light of literary, 
political and religious ideals of Middle Ages. Life and times 
of Dante. Also Vita Nuova. Three hours a week. 



58 Courses of Instruction 

Mod. Lang. 377-378. ITALIAN MYSTICS. 

Selections from I Fioretti di San Francesco, the Letters of 
Saint Catherine of Siena and the Sermons of Fra Girolamo 
Savonarola. Three hours a week. 
Mod. Lang. 473-474. ITALIAN WRITERS FROM THE 
RENAISSANCE TO THE NINE- 
TEENTH CENTURY. 
Biographical sketches and works of principal authors of 
period. Various movements, scientific spirit of the 18th 
century, the theatre of Goldoni. 
Mod. Lang. 475-476. NINETEENTH CENTURY ITALIAN 
LITERATURE. 
Manzoni and others. The new national feeling in literature. 
Romanticism. Three hours a week. MR. CARELLO 

Mod. Lang. 477-478. CARDUCCI; TASCOLI; D'ANNUN- 
ZIO. 
Biographical sketches and intensive, appreciative reading 
of the most representative writers of the "New Italy". Three 
hours a week. 

SPANISH 

♦Mod. Lang. 181-182. SPANISH I. (3) (3) 

Essentials of Spanish Grammar. Elementary reading. 

MOTHER GUEVARA 
*Mod. Lang. 185-186. SPANISH CONVERSATION. (2) (2) 

MOTHER GUEVARA 
♦Mod. Lang. 187-188. SPANISH COMPOSITION. (3) (3) 
Exercise in the writing of Spanish compositions. 

MOTHER GUEVARA 

*Mod. Lang. 281-282. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH. (3) (3) 

Continuation of Mod. Lang. 181-182. MR. REGALADO 

•Mod. Lang. 285-286. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE. 

(3) (3) 
A general view of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages 

to the present day. Lectures, reading and reports. Ordi- 
narily a prerequisite for more advanced courses. 

MR. REGALADO 



Courses of Instruction 59 

•Mod. Lang. 381-382. SPANISH - AMERICAN LITERA- 
TURE. (3) (3) 
A study of the principal writers of all the Spanish- American 
countries. Lectures, reading and reports. 

MR. REGALADO 

Mod. Lang. 387-388. MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE. 
The beginnings of Spanish Literature. 

Mod. Lang. 383-384. 18TH AND 19TH CENTURY SPAN- 
ISH LITERATURE. (3) (3) 

MR. REGALADO 

Mod. Lang. 389-390. THE SPANISH RENAISSANCE. 

(2) (2) 
Emphasis will be placed upon the development of the novel 
and poetry. The Cancioneros and courtly verse, Villena, 
Santillana, Juan de Mena, Amadis de Gaula and La Celes- 
tina. 

♦Mod. Lang. 481-482. TWENTIETH-CENTURY SPANISH 

LITERATURE. (3) (3) 
A study of the contemporary Spanish Literature. The first 
semester will deal with modern trends, in particular the 
work of the "Generation del 98". The second semester 
will cover "post-modernism" in prose and poetry. Lectures, 
readings and class reports. MR. REGALADO 

Mod. Lang. 491-492. EL SIGLO DE ORO. (3) (3) 

The principal writers studied will be Fray Luis de Leon, 
Gongora, Saint Teresa of Avila, Saint John of the Cross, 
Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Alarcon and 
Calderon. MR. REGALADO 

♦Mod. Lang. 493-494- CERVANTES. (3) (3) 

A study of Cervantes and his work, particularly Don 
Quixote and the Novelas Ejemplares. MR. REGALADO 

Mod. Lang. 495-496. MODERN SPANISH NOVEL. (3) (3) 
Development of the Spanish novel from La Gaviota. 



6o 



Courses of Instruction 



MUSIC 

Students who are taking a Bachelor of Arts curriculum with 
a major in music must have had previous training in voice or a 
musical instrument, and they must show evidence of musical 
ability in an audition. If they are majoring in instrumental 
music, they must take the following courses: 

Mu. 213-214. History of Music 
Mu. 225-226. Harmony 
Mu. 327-328. Counterpoint I 
Mu - 335-336- Style and Interpreta- 
tion ; Contemporary 
Music 
Senior Year Mu. 41Q Counterpoint II 

Musical Composition 
Principles of Conduct- 
ing or Orchestration 
Repertory Class 



Sophomore Year 
Junior Year 



Mu. 419 
Mu. 421-422. 
Mu. 424 or 

401-402. 
Mu. 429-430. 



Voice majors must take the following courses: 
Sophomore Year Mu. 213-214. History of Music 

Mu. 223-224. The Story of the Opera 
Mu. 225-226. Harmony 
Junior Year Mu. 335-336. Style and Interpreta- 

t i o n ; Contemporary 
Music 
Senior Year Mu. 440. Choral Conducting 

One year of piano or organ (Junior Year preferably). Two 
hours practice per hour of class. 
One year each of Italian, French and German. 
Students are required to devote an average of eight hours a 
week to Applied Music. Electives may be chosen in the field 
of Music under the guidance of the Dean and the Major Pro- 
fessor. 
Music 101-102. INTRODUCTORY THEORY OF MUSIC. 
Music 119-120. HARMONY I. (3) (3) 



Courses of Instruction 61 

Music 121-122. SIGHT READING. (2) (2) MR. SOKOL 
♦Music 213-214. HISTORY OF MUSIC I. (3) (3) 

The development of music and instruments from the earliest 
times. MR. SOKOL 

Music 225-226. HARMONY II. (3) (3) 

Music 227-228. ADVANCED SIGHT READING. (2) (2) 

Music 313-314. HISTORY OF MUSIC II. (3) (3) 
♦Music 323-324. MUSIC APPRECIATION. (2) (2) 

The development of music from the earliest periods to mod- 
ern times; musical forms; styles, instruments. A guide to 
better understanding and enjoyment of music. 

MRS. BALLING 
♦Music 327-328. COUNTERPOINT I. (3) (3) 

Basic principles of counterpoint; strict rules and their appli- 
cation to two- and three-part writing in species A (note 
against note) and species B (two notes against one note). 
Prerequisite: Mu. 225-226. MR. SOKOL 

Music 329-330. ORGAN CLASS. 
One hour a week. 

Music 332. BOY CHOIR TRAINING. 
♦Music 335. STYLE AND INTERPRETATION; CONTEM- 
PORARY MUSIC. (1) 
A thorough study of various styles; correct and planned in- 
terpretation. Charts. MRS. BALLING 

Music 401-402. ORCHESTRATION. (2) (2) 

The technique of instruments of the orchestra; principles 
of orchestration and analysis of orchestral scores. Score 
reading and writing. Prerequisites: Mu. 225-226, Mu. 
327-328. 
♦Music 419. COUNTERPOINT II. (3) (2) 

Analysis of simple polyphonic forms; two- and three-part 
writing in species C (four notes against one) and D Florid 
counterpoint; writing of simple polyphonic compositions. 
Analysis of more elaborate polyphonic forms; writing of 
4-8 part counterpoint in various species; writing of fugues. 
Free-style counterpoint. MRS. BALLING 



62 Courses of Instruction 

Music 421-422. COMPOSITION I. (3) (3) 

A. Basic elements of free-style composition; melodic and 
rhythmical patterns; study of simple forms and application 
to creative work. 

B. Analysis and rules of more elaborate musical forms; 
practical application. Three hours a week- 
Music 423-424. COMPOSITION II. (3) (3) 

Continuation of Music 421-422. 
♦Music 427-428. ENSEMBLE. (1) (1) 

MRS. BALLING 
♦Music 433-434- OPERA WORKSHOP. (5) (5) 

MRS. BALLING 
♦Music 435-436. MUSIC LITERATURE. (2) (2) 

MR. SOKOL 
♦Music 431-432. PIANO METHODS. (2) (2) 

The organization of subject matter, procedure of instruc- 
tion. This course is designed to prepare students for teach- 
ing music to individual pupils. MRS. BALLING 
♦Music 437-438. MUSIC CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT. 
(2) (2) MR. SOKOL 
Music 439-440. CHORAL CONDUCTING. (2) (2) 

Techniques for choral groups including conducting of 
Chant; polyphony and modern music. Principles of voice 
production. MR. SOKOL 

LITURGICAL MUSIC 
Music 111. GREGORIAN CHANT IA. 

The practical and theoretical knowledge necessary for learn- 
ing and teaching the Chant— the fundamentals of Gregorian 
rhythm according to the principles of Solesmes. Modes and 
notation. 
Music 112. GREGORIAN CHANT IB. 

This course includes a practical study of the Ordinary of 
the Mass, the Requiem Mass, the Third Mass of Christmas, 
Masses for Forty Hours, and a more specialized study of 
Gregorian rhythm and modes. Prerequisite: Gregorian 
Chant IA. 



Courses of Instruction 63 

Music 111. GREGORIAN CHANT IIA. 

This course embraces a deeper study of the Modes, of 
Gregorian forms; the Proper of the Mass; the simple psalm- 
ody and regular Sunday Vespers. Prerequisite: Gregorian 
Chant IB. 

Music 212. GREGORIAN CHANT IIB. 

Modal and rhythmic structure of Psalmody and Hymnody. 

Music 311. GREGORIAN CHANT III A. 

A classification of Gregorian elements and particularized 
analysis as made in Le N ombre Musical Gregorien Vol. I 
and II by Dom Andre Mocquereau, O.S.B. Prerequisite: 
Gregorian Chant IIB. 

Music 312. GREGORIAN CHANT IIIB. 

An extension of Gregorian Chant IIIA. Advanced chi- 
ronomy and detailed analyses. Prerequisite: Gregorian 
Chant IIIA. 

Music 411. GREGORIAN CHANT IV. 

Modal Analysis. Gregorian modes as derived from the 
Greek tonal system; development of syllabic, neumatic and 
melismatic chants; modal and tonal analysis of outstanding 
melodies. Prerequisite: Gregorian Chant IIIB. 

Music 215. GREGORIAN ACCOMPANIMENT IA. 

Elements of correct Chant accompaniment; particular atten- 
tion to the analysis of the chant tonalities; study of the 
proper harmonic background for the Chant. Prerequisites: 
Gregorian Chant I and some knowledge of harmony and 
counterpoint. 

Music 216. GREGORIAN ACCOMPANIMENT IB. 

Application of the principles of accompaniment as studied 
in I A to transposition. Prerequisite: Gregorian Accompani- 
ment IA. 

Music 315-316. GREGORIAN ACCOMPANIMENT II. 

Application of the principles of accompaniment to Vespers 
and Propers of Masses; simple preludes and modulations. 



64 Courses of Instruction 

Music 451. SURVEY OF THE LITURGICAL YEAR FOR 
A practical course in routine as well as a comprehensive 
survey of the essential high points of the liturgical year. 

Music 217. CONDUCTING I. 

This class will give students an oportunity of applying by 
conducting what has been studied in the Gregorian Chant 
classes. Prerequisite: Music 111. 

Music 317. CONDUCTING II. 

The principles of conducting Gregorian Chant developed 
to include the Proper of the Mass and melismatic chants. 
Prerequisites: Music 211 and 217. 

Music 417. CONDUCTING III. 

An extension of chironomy; simple two, three, and four 
part motets, religious and secular. 

Music 109. CHOIR TECHNIQUE. 

Gregorian Chant Masses and Vespers. Polyphonic Masses 
and Motets— suggestions are given for carrying out the Motu 
Proprio; the Liturgical Year. 

Music 375. SPECIAL METHODS I. 

Methods of teaching music in the elementary school adapt- 
ed to the needs of the archdiocese of Boston. 

Music 475. METHODS II. 

Theoretical presentation of modern methods of teaching 
music. 

Music 331. CHORAL SINGING I. 

Unison, two- and three-part songs suitable vocally and 
rhythmically for elementary schools and for secondary 
schools. Analysis with a view to artistic rendition and stress 
on the pedagogical approach. 

NATURAL SCIENCESf 

For the benefit of pre-medical students the recommendations 

of the American Medical Association have been followed in the 

selection of courses to be offered. Every effort will be made to 

fit students for the particular medical school of their choice. 



•{•Laboratory period: 100 minutes. 



Courses of Instruction 



65 



Students who elect as a major subject either physics or chemistry 
or biology are required to have completed at least the general 
course in each of the other two. 
♦Science 101-102. GENERAL SCIENCE. (4) (4) 

Introduction to the methods of science; elements of the 
various sciences. DR. WANIEK 

MISS JULIAN 
MRS. FRAWLEY 

BIOLOGY 

Requirements for a student majoring in Biology. 

Freshman Year— as on pages 30-31. Freshman Mathematics is 
taken instead of a language. 



Sophomore Year J 


unior Year 




Theology 6 credits 
Philosophy 6 credits 
World Literature 


Theology 

Philosophy 

Anatomy 


4 credits 
6 credits 
8 credits 


II 6 credits 


Organic Chemis- 




General Botany 4 credits 


try 


8 credits 


General Zoology 4 credits 


Foreign language 


6 credits 


General Physics I 8 credits 
Mathematics for 


32 credits 


Science I 4 credits 






38 credits 






Senior Year 






Theology 
Philosophy 
Contemporary 
American 


8 credits 
4 credits 




Civilization 


6 credits 




Physiology 8 credits 
Histology and 

Embryology or 

Genetics and 




Parasitology 
or Biochemistry 


9 credits 
10 credits 
34 credits 




01 


• 36 credits 





66 Courses of Instruction 

♦Science 201. GENERAL BOTANY. (4) 

A study of the morphology and physiology of the plant 
kingdom. Demonstration and field trips. MISS JULIAN 

♦Science 202. GENERAL ZOOLOGY. (4) 

A general study of the vertebrate and invertebrate phyla; 
principles of classification, structure, function and develop- 
ment as exemplified in various type forms. Prerequisite: 
Science 201. MISS JULIAN 

Science 305-306. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. (4^) ( 4 j£) 
A comparative study of the anatomy of the systems of the 
vertebrates including man. Laboratory work consists of the 
dissection of the dogfish, necturus and the rabbit. Pre- 
requisite: Science 205. 

Science 307-308. PHYSIOLOGY. ( 4 j4) (4^) 

A general consideration of the properties and activities of 
cells and tissues. The functions of the major systems and 
their interrelations. Metabolism, nutrition, irritability and 
energy transformations. 

Science 303. HISTOLOGY. ( 4 }4) 

A study of the structure of the animal tissues and their asso- 
ciation in organs and systems. Fundamental histological 
technique. 

Science 304. EMBRYOLOGY. ( 4 j£) 

A study of the genesis and development of the various tissues, 
organs and systems of the vertebrates with special emphasis 
on the chick, pig and human. Prerequisite: Science 206. 

Science 403. GENETICS. ( 4 j£) 

In this course the genetic principles derived from experi- 
mentation with both plants and animals are considered, to- 
gether with their application to practical problems. 

Science 308. PARASITOLOGY. (4^) 

A general survey of the existing knowledge of the parasites 
of man and other vertebrates particularly in respect to struc- 
ture, life histories, distributions and method of transfer. 

Science 401. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. (4) 

A study of the invertebrates with special emphasis on marine 
types. 

Science 402. MICROSCOPIC TECHNIQUE. (2) 



Courses of Instruction 



6 7 



A study of the sectioning and staining of Histological and 
Bacteriological specimens. Prerequisites: Science 206 and 
Science 303. 
Science 404. MICROBIOLOGY. (4^) 

A study of the nature, life processes, economic importance 
and medical significance of bacteria. Laboratory consists of 
sterilization techniques, preparing culture media, cultiva- 
tion of microorganisms, staining and identification. 

CHEMISTRY 

Requirements for a student majoring in chemistry: 
Freshman Year: As on pages 30-31. Freshman Mathematics 

is taken instead of a language. 



>phomore Year J 


unior Year 




Theology 6 credits 


Theology 


4 credits 


Philosophy 6 credits 


Philosophy 


6 credits 


World Literature 


Organic Chemis- 




II 6 credits 


try 


10 credits 


General Physics I 8 credits 


Physical Chemis- 




Qualitative and 


try 


6 credits 


Quantitative 


General Biology 


8 credits 


Chemistry 8 credits 




34 credits 


Mathematics for 






Science 4 credits 






38 credits 






Senior Year 






Theology 


8 credits 




Philosophy 


4 credits 




Contemporary 






American 






Civilization 


6 credits 




Language 


6 credits 




Physics II 


8 credits 




or Advanced 






Biology 


9 credits 




or Biochemistry 


5 credits 




37 or 38 credits 





68 Courses of Instruction 

♦Science 121-122. INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (4) (4) 

Elements; compounds; laws and theories of chemical 
phenomena. MISS JULIAN 

♦Science 223. QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS (Semi-Micro). 

(5) 
A detailed treatment of ionic relationships and chemical 
equilibrium, as applied to solutions of electrolytes. Ordi- 
nary methods of separating and identifying the more com- 
mon metallic and non-metallic ions in solutions. The 
modern semi-micro technique is employed in laboratory 
work. Prerequisite: Science 121-122. MISS KANE 

♦Science 224. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. (5) 

The theory, methods and techniques of volumetric pro- 
cedures in quantitative analysis. Prerequisite: Science 223. 

MISS KANE 

Science 311. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. (3) 

A brief course designed for students not doing major work 
in Chemistry. One quarter is devoted to the study of 
Qualitative Analysis using semimicro technique, while the 
second quarter provides a balanced combination of the 
technique, theory, and stoichiometry in Quantitative Analy- 
sis. 

♦Science 327-328. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. (5) (5) 

An introductory course dealing with the preparation, prop- 
erties, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic organic com- 
pounds. Laboratory work parallels the lectures. Prerequi- 
site: Science 121-122. MISS KANE 

♦Science 429-430. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. (3) (3) 

A study of the laws controlling chemical phenomena, with 
special emphasis on the properties of substances in the 
gaseous, liquid and solid states. The kinetics of chemical 
reactions, thermochemistry, photochemistry and radio- 
activity. Prerequisites: Science 121-122, 223, 224, and 241- 
242 and Mathematics 203-204. MISS KANE 



Courses of Instruction 69 

♦Science 432. BIOCHEMISTRY. (5) 

A study of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and their application 
to biological processes; the chemistry of digestion, respira- 
tion, blood, tissues, etc. Prerequisites: Science 121-122, 201- 
202, 223, 224, 327-328. MISS KANE 

PHYSICS 

♦Science 241-242. GENERAL PHYSICS I (Mechanics, Sound 
and Thermodynamics). (4) (4) 
Mechanics: Units, statics and kinematics, dynamics of solids, 
gravitation, structure of matter, elasticity, liquid and gases, 
molecular forces, hydrostatics and hydrodynamics. Acous- 
tics: oscillations and waves, resonance, propagation of sound, 
musical sounds, applications of sound. Thermodynamics: 
Kinetic theory of gases, temperature and measurements, be- 
havior of gases, different kinds of thermal processes, heat 
and work, 1st, 2nd, and 3rd fundamental law of Thermo- 
dynamics, reversible processes and the Carnot cycle, 
enthropy, radiation, Stefan-Boltzmann law, heat transmis- 
sion. DR. WANIEK 
Science 343-344. GENERAL PHYSICS II (Electricity and 
Magnetism, Optics, Molecular and Atomic 
Physics). (4) (4) 
Electricity and Magnetism: Fundamental Units and Laws. 
Electro- and Magnetostatics. Electrodynamics: Effects of 
electric current. Measuring instruments. A.C. and D.C. cir- 
cuits. Capacity and resistance. Faraday's laws. Electro- 
magnetic Waves; Maxwell's Theory. Optics: Refraction, 
reflection, interference, diffraction, dispersion and polariza- 
tion. Photometry. Electromagnetic Theory of Light. Light 
emission and absorption. Fluorescence and other phenom- 
ena. Atomic Physics: Structure of matter, Particles and 
Waves. Radiation and corpuscles. Natural and Artificial 
Radioactivity. Atomic and Nuclear Structure. Disintegra- 
tion and Energy. 



70 Courses of Instruction 

Science 447-448. ADVANCED PHYSICS I. (4) (4) 

Kinetic Theory of Gases; Elementary Particles; the Nuclear 
Atom; Wave Corpuscles; Atomic Structure and Spectral 
lines; Spin of the Electron and Pauli's principle; Chemical 
Bonds; Molecular Structure; Matter in Electric and Mag- 
netic fields; Quantum Statistics; Nuclear Physics, the prop- 
erties of the Nucleus; Nuclear Forces and the Two-Body 
Problem at different Energies; Nuclear Spectroscopy; Beta 
decay; Nuclear reactions; Nuclear structure. 

Science 449-450. ADVANCED PHYSICS II. (3) (3) 

Preparation of thesis combined with experimental or theo- 
retical research on a definite topic. Discussion of present 
theories and of results from current research. Laboratory 
practice. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Students majoring in Philosophy are required to take the fol- 
lowing courses: 

Sophomore Year: Phil. 211-212 or Phil. 403-404 

Junior Year: Phil. 407-408 or Phil. 427-428 

Senior Year: Phil. 427-428 

Other courses may be chosen as electives under the guidance 
of the Dean and the Major Professor. 
♦Phil. 105. LOGIC. 

Formal Logic: Simple apprehension, concept and term, 
noun and verb. Definition and division. Judgment. Oppo- 
sition of propositions. Reasoning, syllogisms, modes and 
figures, reduction. Induction. Fallacies. 
Material Logic: The nature of Logic. The doctrine of uni- 
versals. Predicables and categories. Demonstration. Three 
hours a week. Required for Freshmen. MR. CURRAN 

♦Phil. 106. METAPHYSICS. 

Nature of metaphysical knowledge. Potency and act. Being 
in itself; transcendental properties of being: unity, truth, 
goodness, and beauty. Predicaments: substance and acci- 



Courses of Instruction 71 

dent. Principle of causality. Change, nature and person. 
Three hours a week. Required for Freshmen. 

MR. CURRAN 

•Phil. 201. COSMOLOGY. 

The creation, contingency and final cause of the world. 
Properties and activities of bodies. Ultimate constitution of 
matter. Atomism, dynamism, hylomorphism. Three hours 
a week. Required for Sophomores. FATHER FRIEL 

♦Phil. 202. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY. 

A study of the nature of man and of his faculties: vegetative, 
sensitive and rational. The origin and destiny of man. 
The human soul and its substantial union with the body. 
Three hours a week. Required for Sophomores. 

FATHER FRIEL 

•Phil. 301-302. GENERAL AND SPECIAL ETHICS. 

General Ethics: The last end of man. Objective and formal 
beatitude. The voluntary. Morality, Law, Sanction. Moral 
habits. The passions. The virtues. 

Special Ethics: Individual right. Legal and distributive 
justice: the common good. Commutative justice: rights 
concerning the body, private ownership, honor and reputa- 
tion. Domestic society. Civil society. This course will be 
taught in conjunction with Theology 307-308. Three hours 
a week. Required for Juniors. MOTHER SANTEN 

Phil. 211-212. BASIC PRINCIPLES: PLATO AND ARIS- 
TOTLE. 
The nature and purpose of philosophy, in principle and as 
exemplified in the works of Plato and Aristotle. 

•Phil. 401. PROBLEMS IN THE HISTORY OF PHIL- 
OSOPHY I. 
The One and the Many, the metaphysical basis of phil- 
osophy; the mind-body relationship. Required for Seniors. 
Two hours a week. MR. FITZGIBBON 

•Phil. 402. PROBLEMS IN THE HISTORY OF PHIL- 
OSOPHY II. 
The problem of the Good; Man and the State. Required for 
Seniors. Two hours a week. MR. FITZGIBBON 



72 Courses of Instruction 

*Phil. 403. PRE-CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY. 

Ancient Oriental philosophy. The pre-Socratic Greek 
philosophers, Plato, Aristotle and the Skeptics. Stoicism, 
Epicureanism, and the neo-platonism of Plotinus. 

MR. FITZGIBBON 
*Phil. 404. CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY: ST. AUGUSTINE 
TO ST. THOMAS AQUINAS. 
St. Augustine, Boethius, Erigena, Roscelin and Abelard. 
The problem of universals. Sts. Anselm, Bonaventure and 
Thomas Aquinas. MR. FITZGIBBON 

Phil. 407-408. THE GREAT QUESTIONS OF 
PHILOSOPHY. 
The subject matter varies from year to year, embracing suc- 
cessively metaphysics, epistemology, psychology and natural 
theology. 
Phil. 413. SAINT AUGUSTINE. 

A study of Saint Augustine's thought set out against his 
historical background. Study of the texts of the Confessions 
and the City of God. Two hours a week. 

Phil. 414. SAINT THOMAS AQUINAS. 

A study of the general principles of Thomistic thought 
accompanied by the detailed analysis of certain works. Two 
hours a week. 

Phil. 423-424. AESTHETICS. 

The metaphysics of the beautiful. Art considered from the 
point of view of the four causes. History of aesthetic theory. 
Two hours a week. 

*Phil. 427. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE STATE I. 

The nature of the state, its justification and purposes, pre- 
rogatives and limitations, relationship to the person. 

MR. FITZGIBBON 

*Phil. 428. THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE STATE II. 

A study of the chief political philosophers from a Thomistic 
viewpoint. MR. FITZGIBBON 



Courses of Instruction 73 

Phil. 430. THE METAPHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL 
PRINCIPLES OF LOVE. 
The nature and end of love; the view of St. Thomas con- 
trasted with the views of modern philosophers. 

*Phil. 431-432. PHILOSOPHY SEMINAR. 

A study of some contemporaneous issues in philosophy and 
possible solutions. MR. FITZGIBBON 

*Phil. 433-434. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY. (3) (3) 

Pre-revolutionary beginnings to the present. General his- 
torical trends; analysis of principal texts of each outstand- 
ing philosopher. MR. CURRAN 

PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION 

Students majoring in the field of psychology and education 
will be required to take the following courses: 

Sophomore Year: Ed. 201-202. 

Junior Year: Ed. 301, 302, 303, 304 or Ed. 401-402. 

Psy. 301-302. 

Ps Y- 3°5-3° 6 - 
Senior Year: Ed. 405-406. 

Ed. 408. 

Ps Y- 3°3-3°4- 
PSYCHOLOGY 

*Psy. 301. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Principles of psychology applied to education; the learning 
process; educational aspects of personality development. 

MR. LYNCH 
*Psy. 302. FAMILY LIFE. (3) 

Social institution of the family; psychology of family rela- 
tionships. MR. LYNCH 
*Psy. 303. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

MR. LYNCH 
*Psy. 304. ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

MR. LYNCH 



74 Courses of Instruction 

# Psy. 305. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Principles of social organization; causes of social disorder; 
personal responsibility in modern life; heredity, environ- 
ment and group pressures. MR. LYNCH 
*Psy. 306. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. (3) 

MR. LYNCH 
Psy. 403-404. HUMAN RELATIONS AND APPLIED PSY- 
CHOLOGY. 
Social and cultural interaction and change; group dynamics; 
application of psychological principles to industry, com- 
merce and other fields. 

EDUCATION 

*Ed. 201-202. PHILOSOPHY AND HISTORY OF EDUCA- 
TION. (2) (2) 
Philosophical foundations and principal theoretical trends 
in the history of education. MISS MARSH 

*Ed. 301, 302, 303, 304. THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL: 

METHODS, MATERIALS AND 
CURRICULUM. 
MISS MARSH, COORDINATOR 
*Ed. 301. LANGUAGE ARTS IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL. (2) MISS DALY 

MISS MARSH 
*Ed. 302. SOCIAL STUDIES AND ARITHMETIC IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. (2) 

MISS LENIHAN 
*Ed. 303. ART AND MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY 
SCHOOL. (2) MISS PYNE 

MR. FITZPATRICK 
*Ed. 304. CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT IN ELEMEN- 
TARY EDUCATION. (2) 
Curriculum construction. Recent development in audio- 
visual aids, science, health and physical education. 

MISS BELL 
MISS HAWKINS 
MISS MARSH 



Courses of Instruction 75 

Ed. 401. PRINCIPLES OF SECONDARY EDUCATION. 

(*) 

Ed. 402. METHODS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. 

Given in the various departments of the college by arrange- 
ment. 
*Ed. 405-406. PRACTICE TEACHING. (3) (3) 

Independent practice teaching for eight weeks in cooperat- 
ing schools. MISS MARSH 
Ed. 407. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION. (2) 

Foreign educational systems; their theory and practice; his- 
torical and comparative approach. MISS MARSH 
*Ed. 408. EDUCATION SEMINAR. (2) 

Contemporary problems in the field of education. 

MISS MARSH 
Note: Students majoring in the field of Education are advised 
to choose electives among the following: Music Appreciation, 
History of Art, General Biology, General Sociology, History of 
Social Thought. 

The following required courses will be of special value to 
students majoring in Education: General Psychology, Contempo- 
rary American Civilization, World Literature, Ethics, and His- 
tory of Philosophy. 

SOCIOLOGY AND ECONOMICS 

The following courses are required of students majoring in 
Sociology and Economics: 

Sophomore Year S. Sc. 261-262. General Sociology 
Junior Year S. Sc. 301-302. Introduction to Economics 

Senior Year S. Sc. 401-402. Sociology Seminar 

Other courses may be chosen as electives under the guidance 
of the Dean and the Major Professor. 

ECONOMICS 

*S. & E. 301-302. INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS. 

(2) (2) 
The fundamental characteristics and institutions of the 



76 Courses of Instruction 

economic society. The factors of production; forms of the 
business unit; value, determination of price; distribution 
of price; distribution of income. Money and banking; pub- 
lic finance, taxation, cyclical fluctuations of business; agri- 
cultural problems; international trade. DR. NEMETHY 
*S. & E. 329. CONTEMPORARY SOCIO-ECONOMIC SYS- 
TEMS. (2) 
A comparative study of the theories and practices of com- 
munism, socialism, fascism, capitalism. DR. NEMETHY 
*S. & E. 330. LABOR ECONOMICS AND PROBLEMS. (2) 
History of the working class movements and trade unionism. 
The problem of wages, unemployment, social security. 
American labor movement, legislation. Remedial measures 
as set forth in the Encyclicals, Rerum Novarum and Quad- 
ragesimo Anno. DR. NEMETHY 

S. & E. 346. CURRENT ECONOMIC PROBLEMS. (2) (2) 
Major contemporary economic problems. 

S. & E. 429-430. ECONOMIC HISTORY. 

Economic development of Europe. Economic and social as- 
pects of national development in America. 

SOCIOLOGY 

One hundred twenty-five hours of social work are required of 
students who choose Social Science for their major subject. 
•S. & E. 261-262. GENERAL SOCIOLOGY. (3) (3) 

Structure of society; nature and implications of biological 
inheritance, environment, race, expansion of population, 
urbanization; permanent and temporary groups. 

DR. NEMETHY 

S. & E. 368. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL AND ECO- 
NOMIC STATISTICS. (3) 
Statistical methods as used in social sciences and economics. 
Organization and presentation of statistical data. Frequency 
distribution and simple correlation. Introduction to time 
series analysis and index numbers. 



Courses of Instruction 77 

S. & E. 375. HISTORY OF SOCIAL THOUGHT. (2) 

A survey of social thought from early times to the present. 
Trends of social thought reflected in the writings of the 
leading American and European sociologists. 

S. & E. 387-388. SOCIAL WORK. (2) (2) 

Development and organization of modern social service un- 
der volunteer and government supervision; fundamental 
methods of social practice; case work, group work, adminis- 
tration; social welfare planning. Field trips will be required. 
*S. & E. 401-402. SOCIOLOGY SEMINAR. (2) (2) 

DR. NEMETHY 
•S. & E. 305. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. (3) 

Social organization; causes of social disorder; personal re- 
sponsibility in modern life; heredity, environment and 
group pressures. MR. LYNCH 

*S. & E. 411-412. ANTHROPOLOGY. (2) (2) 

An introduction to a study of primitive man and the 
origins of civilization, folkways and institutions of primitive 
people; case study of various primitive groups; problems and 
methods in the study of culture. DR. NEMETHY 

S. & E. 468. POLLS AND MEASUREMENTS OF PUBLIC 
OPINION. 
Review of methods and practical application. 

S. & E. 469. CURRENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS. 
Two hours a week. 

S. & E. 471. CRIMINOLOGY AND PENOLOGY. 

A survey of the historical schools of thought dealing with 
the causes, treatment, and prevention of crime. Two hours 
a week. 

S. & E. 472. SOCIOLOGY AND RELIGIONS. 

Naturalness of religion as a social factor. Pre-Christian, 
Christian, Hebrew, Chinese, Greek, Roman cultures, and 
the Patristic Age. 

THEOLOGY 
See p. 42. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 1955 

Mary Amlaw, Somerville, Mass Music 

Claire Bacciocco, Cincinnati, Ohio French 

F. Patricia Barrett, West Barrington, R. I English 

Patricia Burns, Boston, Mass History 

M. Patricia Byrne, Detroit, Michigan History** 

Mary Chisholm, Wellesley Hills, Mass Education 

Joan Comba, Milford, Mass Music 

Florence Connolly, Chestnut Hill, Mass History 

Maureen Cortelli, Plymouth, Mass History 

Joan Costello, Quincy, Mass English 

Rose- Anne Dognin, Providence, R. I French 

Patricia Donovan, New York, N. Y English 

Patricia Finn, Waterbury, Conn Classics 

Donna Haider, Winnetka, 111 English 

Frances Johnston, Detroit, Mich Education 

Marie T. Jugeat, Forest Hills, N. Y French 

Mary Laird, Caracas, Venezuela Spanish* 

Patricia Leclaire, Oxford, Mass Biology 

L. Lee McGrady, Rochester, N. Y English 

Carolyn Morgan, West Roxbury, Mass Education 

Mary Jane Moyles, Brooklyn, N. Y History 

Catherine Mullen, East Greenwich, R. I. . . History 

Mary Mona Mullen, East Greenwich, R. I Philosophy 

Yasuko Ohashi, Yokohama, Japan History 

Norma Parchment, Jamaica, B. W. I Spanish 

Jane Quigley, Geneva, New York Social Sciences 

Caroline Quinlan, Greenwich, Conn Philosophy** 

Elizabeth Anne Reilly, Jamaica Plain, Mass English 

Kuniko Shiobara, Tokyo, Japan Social Sciences 

Dalia Skudsinskaite Ivaska, So. Boston, Mass Chemistry 

Ann Logan Sperry, Wilton, Conn English 

Carin Stein, Halifax, Nova Scotia French 

Helen Sullivan, Newton Centre, Mass Biology 

Winifred Weber, Detroit, Michigan Biology 

Elizabeth Wheelwright, Keene, N. H Philosophy 

Nadia Wolanyk, Cleveland, Ohio Biology** 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Mary F. Nolan, West Roxbury, Mass Social Sciences 

BACHELOR OF MUSIC 

Helen Badenhausen, B.A., Short Hills, N. J. 

Florence R. Herlihy, Newton, Mass. 

Sister Julia Louise Sullivan, S.N.D., B.A., Waltham, Mass. 



•Degree Magna Cum Laude 
•♦Degree Cum Laude 

78 



CLASS OF 1956 

Helen Bartko, 260 West Avenue, Stratford, Conn. 

Alice M. Bonin, 140 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Margot Bourgeois, 700 Andover Street, Lowell, Mass. 

Catherine F. Brennan, 597 Fourth Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ursula Cahalan, 3037 Van Alstyne Blvd., Wyandotte, Mich. 

Sandra Ceres, Main Street, Hancock, N. H. 

Mary L. Collins, 100 Day Street, Norwood, Mass. 
v Ann Carroll Cullom, 2 Gilmore Court, Scarsdale, N. Y. 
I Elizabeth A. Dempsey, 7321 Elbow Lane, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grace Donovan, 30 Palmer Avenue, Swampscott, Mass. 

Kathryn J. Galvin, 49 Monument Avenue, Charlestown, Mass. 
•, Mary Ellen Garrity, 27 Cross Street, Uxbridge, Mass. 

Carole M. Gillis, 176 Millburn Avenue, Millburn, New Jersey 
^Lucille T. Hartigan, 16584 Parkside, Detroit, Mich. 

Marian Labourdette, Indian Avenue, Newport, R. I. 

Patricia Leary, 480 Brook Road, Milton, Mass. 

Marion Linehan, 10 Myrtle Street, Belmont, Mass. 
, Aileen R. Mannix, 146 Beach 148 Street, Neponsit, L.I., N. Y. 

Sheila E. McCarthy, 100 Thornton Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Sally Ann McCarty, 18 Georgia Avenue, Lowell, Mass. 

Mary Ellen McKeon, 219 Church Road, Ardmore, Pa. 
i^Evelyn E. Melloon, 103 Woodbury Street, Providence, R. I. 

Janice A. Murphy, 119 Allerton Road, Milton, Mass. 

Sheila Murphy, 157 Langley Road, Newton Centre, Mass. 
KGail O'Donnell, 22688 East River Road, Grosse He, Mich. 
I Jean K. O'Donoghue, 33 Robbins Road, Arlington, Mass. 
t.M&ry C. Prendergast, 41 Hillcroft Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 

Keiko Sato, 1656 Nako-cho Sakurayama, Zushi, Kamagawa-ken, Japan 
, Jane S. Slade, 36 Edgemere Road, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 

Shirley M. Spencer, 285 Dana Avenue, Milton, Mass. 

Shirley Starrs, 263 Somerset Street, West, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 

Eleanor E. Taft, 53 Fairfield Road, Cranston, R. I. 

Jean Wallace, 2523 Park Place, Evanston, 111. 

Mary F. Whalen, 211 Independence Drive, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 



?* 



79 



80 Student Register 

CLASS OF 1957 

Mary Ann Beattie, 729 Pemberton Road, Grosse Pointe Park, Mich. 

Barbara Ann Bireley, 1325 Greenwood Boulevard, Evanston, 111. 

Janet Ann Black, 8 Pond Street, Greenfield, Mass. 

Patricia A. Blanchard, 465 Centre Street, Newton, Mass. 

Nancy Bowdring, 139 College Avenue, Somerville, Mass. 

Nancy M. Bowen, 16 Melrose Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Carol Anne Burke, 81 Wyoming Road, Newtonville, Mass. 

Margaret K. Concannon, 45 Hollis Street, Milton, Mass. 

Elaine T. Conley, "Lia Fale", Ridgefield, Conn. 

Catherine A. Connolly, 80 Claremont St., Newton, Mass. 

Suzanne L. Cote, 479 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, R. I. 

Margaret H. Craig, 15 Newlands Street, Chevy Chase, Md. 

Marie Therese Cunningham, 149 Eliot Street, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Joan B. David, 659 Hope Street, Providence, R. I. 

Elizabeth F. Doyle, 71 Keene Street, Providence, R. I. 

Lois R. Garner, 21 Beacon Street, Norwood, Mass. 

Marie Gerin-Lajoie, 285 Avenue McDougall, Montreal, Canada 

Marilyn C. Gilmore, U. S. Naval Hospital, Chelsea, Mass. 

Constance M. Hanley, 788 Riverside Drive, New York, N. Y. 

Joan J. Hanlon, 5 Felton Court, Saugus, Mass. 

Nancy Harvey, 33 Warren Street, Watertown, Mass. 

Patricia Hinchey, 355 Essex Street, Salem, Mass. 

Catherine Joyce, 29 Blake Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Mary Lacey Kelly, 170 Brown Street, Providence, R. I. 

Barbara A. King, 19 Meadowbrook Road, Wellesley, Mass. 

Nancy L. Kottenstette, 1023 Harvard Road, Grosse Pointe Park, Mich. 
I Ann M. Labadie, 75 Biddle Avenue, Wyandotte, Mich. 

Marjorie A. Lee, 26 Amherst Road, Wellesley, Mass. 
, Barbara Lowe, 3 Emmaville Avenue, Kingston, Jamaica, B. W. I. 

♦Mary Leigh Madden, 44 South Allen Street, Albany, N. Y. 

Winifred G. Madden, 81 Warren Street, Norwich, Conn. 

Maria de Lourdes Mancera, Ave. Coyoacan (antes Chilpancingo) No. 154, 
Mexico City, Mexico 

Maria Luisa Mancera, Ave. Coyoacan (antes Chilpancingo) No. 154, Mexico 
City, Mexico 

Ann J. Marshall, 650 Park Drive, Kenilworth, 111. 

•Kathleen McCann, 360 Salisbury Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Sheila M. McCue, 161 Washington Street, Gloucester, Mass. 

Carol A. McCurdy, 283 Woods Haven Road, Pawtucket, R. I. 
1 Michelle M. McGarty, 131 Bay State Road, Boston, Mass. 



•Studying in Europe 1955-56. 



Student Register 81 

Molly McHugh, 251 Linden Lane, Merion, Pa. 

Margaret A. McMurrer, 125 Aspen Avenue, Auburndale, Mass. 

Josephine Medart, 45 Overhills Drive, St. Louis, Mo. 

Mary Ann Morley, 16 Colonial Avenue, Waltham, Mass. 

Mary Augusta Morley, 1515 Centre Street, Newton, Mass. 

Vinita Murray, 262 Beach Street, Revere, Mass. 
„ Grace Barbara Nash, 49 The Terrace, Katonah, New York 

Ann Nooney, 406 Hawthorne, Webster Groves, Mo. 

Mary Jane O'Connell, 7 Deal Road, Island Park, N. Y. 

Ann M. O'Neil, 17B Appleby Road, Wellesley, Mass. 
t Mary Elizabeth O'Riley, 2419 N. St. John's Ave., Highland Park, Illinois 

Eleanor G. Pope, 405 Deerfield Road, Deerfield, 111. 

Harriet Anne Reilly, 14 Arborway, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Patricia A. Ritchie, 143 East Emerson Street, Melrose, Mass. 

Diane Russell, 9 Elm Park Blvd., Pleasant Ridge, Mich. 

Marisol Sanroma, P. O. Box 8276, Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Judith Scannell, 16 Belvidere Avenue, Worcester, Mass. 

Jane Sughrue, 56 Tennis Place, Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Marion W. Sullivan, 86 Douglas Road, Belmont, Mass. 

Cornelia A. Weldon, 1 Johnson Road, Andover, Mass. 7 * 

Mary Winslow, 3106 P Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

CLASS OF 1958 

Rhoda Ackerson, American Embassy, Buenos Aires, Argentina 
Cristina Arango, Carrera 7 #7249, Bogota, Colombia 
Mary Azzara, 176 Tulip Avenue, Floral Park, New York 
Mary Jo Bacciocco, 2726 Johnstone Place, Cincinnati, Ohio 
Nancy Lee Brickley, 18084 Birchcrest Drive, Detroit, Mich. 
Veronica Brown, 26 Payne Road, Newton Highlands, Mass. 
Mary F. Cahill, 1 Waldron Avenue, Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 
Shelley A. Carroll, Apartado 267, Caracas, Venezuela 
Ann L. Clausmeyer, 62 Dalton Road, Newton Centre, Mass. 
Mary C. Corbett, 87 Bushnell Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
Mary Ellen Cunningham, 334 Burns Street, Forest Hills, N. Y. 
Madeline E. Day, 100 Shaw Avenue, Cranston, R. I. 
Anne L. DeFazio, 82 Morton Street, Needham Heights, Mass. 
Mary B. Denman, 440 Ovington Avenue, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jane C. Dick, 168 Westwood Road, New Haven, Conn. 
Judith Donovan, 125 E. 84th Street, New York, N. Y. 
Betsey J. Dray, 40 Arlington Street, Hyde Park, Mass. 
, Beth Duffy, 256 Hillside Avenue, Pawtucket, R. I. 
Martha A. Dwyer, 29 Dover Street, Providence, R. I. 
MaTy Jane Eagan, 33 Nahant Street, Lynn, Mass. 



82 Student Register 

Muriel Jo Englert, 360 Main Street, Catskill, N. Y. 

Susan E. Fay, 32 Sias Lane, Milton, Mass. 

Catherine Flanagan, American Embassy, New Delhi, India 

Ursula M. Gahan, 33 Everett Ave., Winchester, Mass. 

Ann C. Gaynor, 78 Berkshire Street, Indian Orchard, Mass. 

Marjorie A. George, 7365 Maryland Avenue, University City, Mo. 

Katherine A. Glutting, 63 Norfolk Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Dolores Gonzalez, Box 124, Monterrey, N. L., Mexico 

Judith D. Goodnow, 75 Handy Road, Grosse Pointe Farms, Mich. 

M. Patricia Hannon, 520 Randolph Avenue, Milton, Mass. 

Carol Healey, 214 Powder House Boulevard, Somerville, Mass. 

Jane Henderson, Southern Avenue, Essex, Mass. 

Carol A. Higgins, 1101 Highland Avenue, Needham, Mass. 

Sheila Hurley, 42 Old Mystic Street, Arlington, Mass. 

Margaret J. Keane, 80 Algonquin Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Genevieve R. Keating, 8 Fairview Avenue, Salem, Mass. 

Mary M. Keating, 1133 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Helen T. Kelly, 1052 South Street, Roslindale, Mass. 

Mary Jane Kennedy, 5300 27th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Denise A. Kirby, 107 Chenery Street, Portland, Maine 

Josephine P. Kirk, 180 Franklin Street, Newton, Mass. 

Moira Mahoney, 49 Cleveland Avenue, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sheila Mannix, 146 Beach 148 Street, Neponsit, L. I., N. Y. 
x Lillith Marzouca, Savanna-la-mar, Jamaica, B. W. I. 

Gail McDonough, 1658 Center Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Rosalie M. McGrory, 7813 Exeter Road, Bethesda, Maryland 
} Bfenda McLachlan, Ohehyahtah Place, Danbury, Conn. 

Helen McLachlan, Boulevard, Newtown, Conn. 

Mvy ^Y- "Mulleq, 28 Brentmoor Park, Clayton, Mo. 

Eileen P. Mullin, 1045 Beacon Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Audrey A. Nolan, 25 Vermont Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Maureen J. O'Brien, 20 Beechtree Road, Rumford, R. I. 

Maureen A. O'Donnell, Longwood Towers, Brookline, Mass. 
1 Margaret P. Peck, 2779 Main Street, Lawrenceville, N. J. 

Mary R. Phelan, 1627 Alcor Terrace, Cincinnati, Ohio 
• Agnes Podolinsky, 5056 Morse Avenue, Skokie, Illinois 

Ann Power, 3 Wakefield Street, Worcester, Mass. 
j Sheila Quinlan, Hillside Road, Greenwich, Conn. 
, Mary A. Quirk, 41 Liberty Street, Hoi yoke, Mass. 

Lucy Reuter, 2 Kingsbury Place, St. Louis, Mo. 

Dorothy Roche, 91 Salisbury Avenue, Garden City, N. Y. 

Maureen Ronan, 673 Boylston Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Lucille M. Saccone, 35 Buswell Park, Newton, Mass. 



Student Register 83 

,^ Leonor Salcedo, Carrera 16 3384, Bogota, Colombia 

Maritza Shaghalian, 23 Essex Street, Cranston, R. I. 

Therese Sullivan, 29 Douglas Road, Belmont, Mass. 

Sandra J. Thomson, 209 Newbury Street, Boston, Mass. 

Norinne Walsh, 73 Whittier Road, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
,,. Barbara A. Welch, 32 Mayflower Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Judith A. Young, 61 Union Street, Pittsfield, Mass. 

CLASS OF 1959 

Paula L. Ajo, 45 East 66th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Margarita Arango, Carrera 7 #7249, Bogota, Colombia 

Gloria Archila, 74th No. 12-62, Bogota, Colombia 

Ofelina Arias, P.O. Box 2033, Panama, Rep. of Panama 

Ann H. Baker, 1060 Randolph Avenue, Milton, Mass. 

Frances M. Beane, 91 Pond Street, Cranston, R. I. 

Dorothy H. Bohen, 93 Cypress Street, Floral Park, N. Y. 

Juanita A. Buckley, 40 Summit Avenue, Wollaston, Mass. 

Katharine Buehler, 35-31 160 Street, Flushing, L. I., N. Y. 

Mary Ellin Burns, 25 Duck Pond Road, Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Helen M. Byrne, 18055 Hamilton Road, Detroit, Michigan 

Elizabeth A. Cahill, 1 Waldron Avenue, Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

Marcia A. Capobianco, 70 Baldwin Orchard Drive, Cranston, R. I. 
*-—EIeanor L. Can*, 106 Andover Street, Peabody, Mass. 

Eleanor J. Cavanagh, 28 Elm Street, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Sarah E. Cavanaugh, 43 Parker Street, Newton Centre, Mass. 

Janet M. Chute, 50 Rustlewood Road, Milton, Mass. 

Susan L. Collins, 23 Emmonsdale Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 
t Joan M. Coniglio, 1185 Park Avenue, New York, N. Y. 

Donna M. Cosgrove, 48 Eliot Street, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Pauline F. Cote, 479 Newport Avenue, Pawtucket, R. I. 
/ Helen M. Craig, 15 Newlands Street, Chevy Chase, Md. 

Marypat Curran, Ardsley Park, Irvington, N. Y. 

Ann L. Dailey, 53 Sherman Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

Marie P. Doelger, 17 East 89th Street, New York, N. Y. 
> Alicia Donnelly, 685 Charles River Street, Needham, Mass. 

Kathleen M. Dowling, 108 Forest Avenue, New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Anne Doyle, 12 Danville Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Donna M. Ducayet, Main Street, Stockbridge, Mass. 

Isabel M. Dunn, 324 E. 41 Street, New York, N. Y. 

Ellen F. Egan, 23 Dale Avenue, Gloucester, Mass. 

Sheila Flanagan, 66 Crabtree Road, Squantum, Mass. 

Ann C. Foley, 16 Shattuck Park Road, Norwood, Mass. 

Janet P. Frantz, Tremont Farm, Media, Pa. 



84 Student Register 

Gail Gallagher, 1 Longview Place, Great Neck, N. Y. 

Mary George, 7365 Maryland, University City, Mo. 
, Mary Alyce Gilmore, 2703 Fontenelle Boulevard, Omaha, Nebraska 

Reita T. Goeckner, 906 Pleasant Avenue, Highland Park, 111. 

Marion D. Good, 743 West Roxbury Parkway, Boston, Mass. 

Janet S. Grant, 111 Westchester Road, Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

Nancy Lee Haas, A-i Sevilla Court Apts., Bala Cynwyd, Pa. 

Joan Haggarty, 5555 Sheridan Road, Chicago, Illinois 

Alice A. Haley, 48 Main Street, Fort Fairfield, Maine 

Gail J. Hibschman, 343 Parkway Drive, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Barbara A. Holters, Green Grove Road, Neptune, N. J. 

Barbara A. Johnson, Cedar Hill, Pompton Lakes, N. J. 
1 Patricia D. Joyce, 21 Dickinson Road, Brighton, Mass. 

Mary L. Kelley, 109 Follen Road, Lexington, Mass. 

Sheila L. Killeen, Buena Vista Avenue, Rumson, New Jersey 

Kathleen M. Kingston, 51 Oakridge Street, Dorchester, Mass. 
, Judith Laird, Apartado 2736, Caracas, Venezuela 

Julia M. Lamy, 9530 Ladue Road, Clayton 24, Missouri 

Sheilah Lane, 25 Hutchinson Avenue, Scarsdale, New York 

Glenna H. LaSalle, 3246 West Shore Road, Warwick, R. I. 

Suzanne C. Lawrence, 16 Slocum Crescent, Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Virginia Little, 60 Don Avenue, Rumford, R. I. 

Suzanne M. Macksoud, 511 Heights Road, Ridgewood, N. J. 

Mary B. Madden, 7 Amherst Road, Wellesley, Mass. 

Maria M. Madera, Box 332, San Juan, Puerto Rico 

Mary A. Maher, 5124 Grant Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 

E. Dean Maloney, 3332 St. Paul Boulevard, Rochester, N. Y. 

Judith V. Marzek, 30 Colt Street, E. Hartford, Conn. 

Anne E. Maslen, 60 East 94th Street, New York, N. Y. 

Susan McAuley, 432 E. Second Street, Perrysburg, Ohio 

Mary Jo McAvinn, 121 Perkins Street, Melrose, Mass. 

Sheila McBrearty, 2435 Burns Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Marilou McCarthy, 5555 Sheridan Road, Chicago, 111. 

Joan McCrudden, 22 Oakland Street, Medford, Mass. 

Vivian C. Mendez, 1727 Beacon Street, Waban, Mass. 

Frances E. Miley, 96 Hinckley Road, Milton, Mass. 

Lilyann Mitchell, 87 Highfield Road, Harrison, N. Y. 

Karen A. Mullin, 11 Woodland Road, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Maryjane Mulvanity, 107 LaGrange Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Ellen Nelson, 62 Windsor Road, Wellesley, Mass. 

Patricia Nessralla, 373 Center Street, Brockton, Mass. 

Joanne A. O'Connor, 9 Dupont Avenue, White Plains, N. Y. 

Lois D. O'Donoghue, 5046 Sedgwick St., N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Student Register 85 

Patricia A. O'Neill, 91 Allerton Road, Milton, Mass. 

Kathleen T. O'Shea, 2 Washington Street, Peabody, Mass. 

Janet Phillips, 34 Sheafe Street, Brookline, Mass. 

Phebe J. Rohan, Cream Street, Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Ann W. Rosenberger, 3900 Royal Boulevard, Lynchburg, Va. 

Julie Saver, 92 S. Montgomery Avenue, Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Jeanne C. Schaeffner, 14 Beech Street, Floral Park, N. Y. 

Dolores A. Seeman, 5217 Elsmere Avenue, Bethesda, Md. 

Sandra N. Sestito, 13 Chelmsford, Road, Rochester, N. Y. 

Katherine E. Sheehan, 7206 Northmoor Drive, University City, Mo. 

Barbara A. Sherman, 34 Upyonda Way, Rumford, R. I. 

Sue Sughrue, 56 Tennis Place, Forest Hills, N. Y. 

Jane Sweeney, 221 Strawberry Hill Avenue, Stamford, Conn. 

Patricia Ann Sweeney, 395 Palisade Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y. 

Ann Linherr Tobin, 6222 Northwood Road, Dallas, Texas 

Sandra Uncles, 140 Ridgewood Road, W. Hartford, Conn. 

Jennie Van Bibber, 494 Washington Street, Dedham, Mass. 

Anne Marie Walsh, 104 Englewood Avenue, Brookline, Mass. 

Mary Lou Webster, 400 California Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Patricia Ann Welsh, 64 Garden Road, Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Maureen White, 12 Ruskin Street, West Roxbury, Mass. 

Jane D. Whitty, 124 Theodore Parker Road, West Roxbury, Mass. 



GIFTS AND BEQUESTS 

Newton College is one of the youngest members of the 
group of schools which have made New England an educational 
center of the country. Its needs are many. Therefore, its Trustees 
will welcome gifts, bequests, or awards which may be dedicated 
to general educational needs, or to the endowment of professor- 
ships, scholarships or fellowships in accordance with the wishes 
of the donor. Such funds could constitute memorials to the 
donor or to any person whom he may name. These benefactions 
may take the form of: Unrestricted Gift 

I give and bequeath to Newton College of the Sacred Heart, 
a religious educational corporation in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, the sum of $ to be used for the benefit of 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart in such manner as the 
Trustees thereof may direct. 

Or Gift for Books 

I give, devise and bequeath to Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart, a religious educational corporation in Newton, Massa- 
chusetts, the sum of $ (or property herein de- 
scribed) to be known as the Book Fund, and 

the income therefrom shall be used for the purchase of 
books for the library of said College (or other needed 
items in the operation of the College). 

Or Residuary Gift 

All the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal 
estate, I devise and bequeath to Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart, a religious educational corporation in New- 
ton, Massachusetts, to be used for the benefit of Newton 
College of the Sacred Heart in such manner as the Trustees 
thereof may direct. 

Or Endowment Fund 

I give and bequeath to Newton College of the Sacred Heart, 
a religious educational corporation in Newton, Massachu- 
setts, $ to constitute an endowment fund to be 

86 



Gifts and Bequests 87 

known as the Fund, such fund to be invested 

by the Trustees of Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
and the annual income thereof to be used for the benefit 
of Newton College of the Sacred Heart in such manner as 
the Trustees may direct or to be used for the following 
purposes: 

NOTE: The above forms are offered as a suggestion only 
and should be rewritten or adapted by legal coun- 
sel to each specific case. 



INDEX 

Absence from Class 33 

Attendance at Classes 33 

Academic Standards 32 

Access to the College (opposite back cover) 

Address of the College 5 

Admission to the Freshman Class 25 

Admission to Advanced Standing 29 

Advisory Board of the College 11 

Aims 22 

Alumnae Association 20 

Art 43 

Attendance at Class 33 

Bachelor of Arts Degree, Requirements 30-3 1 

Bible Lectures 34 

Biology 65-67 

Business Administration 19 

Chemistry 67-69 

Classical Languages and Literature 43~47 

College Calendar 7-10 

College Entrance Examination Board Tests 26-29 

College Life 23-24 

Correspondence 6 

Courses of Instruction 42-77 

Dates of Payment 39 

Degree of Bachelor of Arts 30-31 

Degree of Bachelor of Music 60 

Degrees Conferred in 1955 78 

Directions for Reaching the College 92 

Duchesne Scholarship 40 

Economics 75-77 

Education 73—75 

English 47-50 

Examinations 33 

Expenses 38-39 

Faculty 12-18 

Formulas for Gifts and Bequests 86-87 

French 54-56 

89 



go Index 

Gael-Coakley Memorial Scholarship Fund 41 

General Information 2 1-24 

German 56-57 

Gifts and Bequests 86-87 

Grant-in-Aid 41 

Greek 43-45 

Health of Students 19, 24 

History 5°~52 

History and General Background of the College 21-22 

Honors 33-34 

In Charge of Health 19 

Italian 57-58 

Janet Stuart Scholarship 40 

Latin 45-47 

Location of the College 22, 92 

Map (on back cover) 

Mater Admirabilis Scholarship 41 

Mathematics 53~54 

Michael Sweeney Scholarship 41 

Modern Foreign Languages 54~59 

Music 60-64 

Natural Sciences 64-70 

Newton College Alumnae Scholarship 41 

Officers of Administration 11 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 20 

Official Recognition 2 

Philosophy 7°~73 

Psychology and Education 73—75 

Physics 69-70 

Physical Education 24 

Placement Office 19, 24 

Pre-medical Course 64 

Recognition 2 

Refunds 38-39 

Register of Students 79~^5 

Requirements for Admission 25 



Index 91 

Requirements for Degree of Bachelor of Arts 30-3 1 

Reservations 39 

Saint Thomas Aquinas Lecture 34 

Scholarships 40-4 1 

Scholastic Average 32 

Sciences 64-69 

Sociology 75-77 

Sociology and Economics 75—77 

Spanish 58-59 

Student Register 79-^5 

Summer Study 31 

Telephone Number 5 

Theology 42-43 

Trustees of the College 11 

Wardens 11 

Withdrawal from College 29 



DIRECTIONS 

The college is located about half way between Newton Centre 
and Newton Corner at 885 Centre Street. It is accessible via: 

BUS 

From Boston. Take Boston College Commonwealth Avenue 
street car in subway to Lake Street; change to bus for 
Commonwealth Avenue and Centre Street. At Centre Street 
take Newton Corner bus. The College is on the left, four- 
tenths of a mile from Commonwealth Avenue. 

or 
Take Brighton-Newton-Watertown street car in subway to 
Newton Corner; take Oak Hill bus which passes the college. 

From Harvard Square: Take Watertown street car to Water- 
town carhouse; change to street car for Newton Corner. 
Take Oak Hill bus to the College. 

From Waltham: Take any Newton bus to Newton Corner. Take 
Oak Hill bus to the College. 

From Cleveland Circle: Take Lower Falls bus and change at 
Newton Centre for Newton Corner bus. 

From Needham: Take Watertown bus and change at Newton 
City Hall for Lake Street bus; change at Commonwealth 
Avenue and Centre Street for Newton Corner bus. 

AUTO 

From Boston: Take Commonwealth Avenue (Route 30) to 
Centre Street in Newton Centre; turn right on Centre Street. 
The College is on the left, four-tenths of a mile from 
Commonwealth Avenue. 

TRAIN 

Take the Boston and Albany R. R. to Newtonville, taxi to Col- 
lege (5 minutes); or take the New York, New Haven and 
Hartford R. R. to Boston, get off at Back Bay Station, taxi to 
College (30 minutes), or walk one-half block to Trinity 
Place Station, take local train to Newtonville, taxi to Col- 
lege, or get off the New York, New Haven and Hartford 
R. R. at Route 128 and taxi to the College (25 minutes). 

92 



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